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Google Business Profile Video Verification Best Practices

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Learn what you must show in the video if you get the Google Business Profile Video Verification Option. Here’s how to do it, step-by-step.

Verification is an important step in properly setting up a Google Business Profile (GBP).

Before your GBP will become visible to the public and you can do all the fun things with your profile – like creating posts, responding to reviews, updating your profile, and more – you must first verify it.

Verification NeededScreenshot from Google Business Profile, August 2022

When a business (i.e., merchant) sets up a Google Business Profile, Google offers a method (or sometimes several ways) to verify the profile.

This verification process helps Google ensure that the business is a real and legitimate business that is eligible for a GBP and meets Google’s guidelines for representing your business on Google.

In an ideal world, Google would actually visit each and every location with a GBP to make sure the business is real and meets all guidelines.

But that, obviously, is not possible.

One of the ways Google can verify a business is through video verification. Video verification is the next best thing to actually visiting a business.

It’s almost like a “digital in-person” check-in on the business.

The video allows Google to actually see the company and more details about the business.

Google’s video verification method tries to authenticate and confirm legitimate businesses and (hopefully) weed out spammy and fake listings that could inundate the Local Pack, Local Finder, and Google Maps and confuse or hurt consumers.

Various Verification Methods

As mentioned, Google provides several ways to verify your business.

It’s important to note that Google decides which verification method a merchant must use to verify its GBP.

Businesses do not get to choose the method of verification – Google picks the verification method for them.

Verification by postcards with PIN numbers used to be the typical method of GBP verification.

But this seems to be changing, and businesses are receiving other ways to verify their Business Profiles.

In February 2022, verifying businesses by postcards sent in the mail was listed first when Google outlined the verification process.

Google Help Document - Postcard VerificationScreenshot from Google, February 2022

However, by July 2022, verification via postcard was bumped down to last on the verification methods list:

Verification MethodsScreenshot from Google, July 2022

This might be a signal that Google is moving towards other ways to verify GBPs, and that merchants should be prepared to verify their listings in ways other than just postcards – like phone, text, email, live video call, and video recording verification.

Why Video Verification?

Google is trying hard to ensure that the GBPs set up are legitimate businesses meeting Google’s guidelines.

With the video verification process, Google is trying to garner the following information:

  • Existence: Is this a genuine/real business? Does it exist?
  • Geographic location: Is the business located where the Business Profile says it is located? (It isn’t easy to film a video of a bookstore in New York City and pretend that it’s a bookstore in London.)
  • User integrity: Is this an authentic company? Is it a real merchant? Google is trying to determine if someone is attempting to commit fraud.
  • Affiliation: Is this merchant actually associated with the business? Do they have the authority to represent the business?

When businesses submit video evidence that proves and shows these things, Google operators can review the video to determine if the evidence presented is strong enough to verify that the business is located where it says it is, performs the work it claims it does, and more.

What Is The Google Business Profile Video Verification Process?

Google offers numerous ways for businesses to verify their GBP, but Google decides which way (or ways) each merchant must verify.

As a business owner, you must verify via the method Google chooses for you.

However, if you absolutely cannot verify via the method offered, you can reach out to the Google Business Profile Support team and see if they can provide you with another way to verify your GBP. An example of this would be if you are asked to verify via text and you only have a landline.

When you get to the verification process, you may be asked to perform the video verification process.

Verify Via VideoScreenshot from Google Business Profile, July 2022

To go through the video verification process, you’ll need a mobile device with a camera.

If you get this verification option, it’s important that you understand the rationale for the video verification.

You should know what needs to be included in the video, so the Google operator reviewing it is convinced that your company exists and does what it says it does. The operator must also be convinced the person taking the video is associated with the business.

They will also want to verify that the geographical location matches the location of the business as listed in its GBP.

It’s also important to follow the on-screen instructions and plan everything out before you start recording the video. Since the video must be done in one continuous video, planning ahead is crucial!

In the video verification process, Google asks the business owner (or someone with authority to represent the business) to create a short, continuous video that provides evidence that the business is an actual, legitimate business.

The video should be short and to the point.

Each video is manually reviewed by a Google employee and is meant to simulate an in-person visit to the business.

Google doesn’t ask you to share anything sensitive – like people’s faces or documents that contain confidential information.

These videos are kept private and are only used for verification purposes.

Don’t worry; It will never be published and can be deleted anytime.

Planning Your Video For Business Profile Video Verification

Before you actually shoot your video, you should plan out what you are going to show in the video, who will be in it, and who will record it.

Next, you’ll want to ensure you cover the items necessary to convince Google that your business is legitimate.

Here are the types of things you want to be sure to show in your video.

Keep in mind that these items do not have to be shown in any particular order – they just all must be shown in the video to prove that your business is real.

Show That Your Business Exists

For this part of the video, you need to show proof that your business exists, where it is located geographically, and other items that prove it’s a legitimate business.

Get verified with videoScreenshot from Google Business Profile, August 2022

It’s important to show the exterior and interior of your company’s building in the video.

If you’re a storefront business, you must show the outside of the building, as well as the permanent signage on the exterior and any signage/branding inside the building.

Also include the location, relevant street signs, and other nearby businesses, so Google can get an idea of where you’re geographically located.

Don’t show unmarked roads or land – that will not help Google establish your location.

Showing your outdoor signage is a must if you have a storefront location (i.e., a storefront location is when local customers visit your place of business, you have permanent signage, and you must have employees staffed at the business location during stated business hours.)

Permanent signage is a requirement for storefront businesses. Vinyl banners or other temporary signs do not count as permanent signage.

If you do not have permanent signage, you do not qualify as a storefront.

Pan your video next door and across the street to show the businesses nearby so Google can double-check with Google Maps and Streetview to ensure that your business is located where you claim it is.

Show surrounding businessesImage from author, August 2022

It’s also vital to walk into your building and show the inside of your company so Google sees that it’s a legitimate business – and not just empty rooms.

Any time you can show your company’s branding on the walls – like in the lobby or entryway – it’s great to show those types of things in the video.

If you work in an office building with multiple floors and many businesses, be sure to show the office building’s business directory pointing out your company’s listing and suite number.

If you have any professional tools that you use, marketing materials, or company branding, be sure to show those in the video as well.

If you’re a Service Area Business (SAB), you will need to show any tools of the trade that you use to perform your work for clients in the video.

For instance, if you are a solar company, you should show the solar panels you install, any installation equipment you use, branded trucks, ladders, any heavy equipment you use, tools of the trade that you have stored, etc.

Are you a lawn care company? Show all your lawnmowing equipment, trimmers, leaf blowers, etc. (The average Joe at home won’t have 10 commercial lawnmowers, for instance – but you do!)

It’s also vital to show your service vehicles with the branding on them. (A video showing a plain white van will not be acceptable.)

So, ensure that your service vehicles are branded with your company name and logo and are seen clearly in the video.

Show Geographic Location

Google wants to know that your business is located where your GBP says it is located. The Google operator needs to be convinced that the company in the video is in the same geographical location as in Google Maps.

If you’re a storefront business, you can show street signs near your business, pan over, and show adjacent companies near your company. However, showing Google a vacant lot where your business should be will not instill confidence that you are a legitimate business.

Show street signsImage by author, August 2022

If you operate your SAB out of your home, show the street signs, your home with your street number on it, your mailbox, and any other things that prove your address.

One way to prove you have a real business is by showing items in the video that only a real business like yours would have.

Get verified with video steps

For example, showing a generic software application on your computer screen will not convince Google that you’re a legitimate business.

Show professional software and your setup

However, if your company uses specific software to operate your business, like if you’re an accountant and you use professional accounting software, you’re a veterinarian and you use software specifically developed for vets’ offices, or you’re a digital marketer or design firm that creates videos or podcasts for clients using a tool like Camtasia, then showing that software on your computer screen and your audio/video setup in the video would help prove to Google that you are legit.

Camtasia ScreenshotScreenshot from Camtasia, August 2022

If you’re a Service Area Business, showing your work van with equipment in the back of the truck in the video is very helpful and useful for the Google operator as they are reviewing your video to determine the legitimacy of your company.

Affiliation: Is The Merchant Real?

For this part of the video, you need to prove that the company is real and that the merchant is actually affiliated with the company and has the authority to represent the business.

That’s why it’s so important that the person in the video is either the owner or manager.

Get verified with video stepsScreenshot of Google Business Profile, July 2022

If you have a storefront business, in the video, you need to show that you have access to employee-only locations or sections of the business.

For instance, show you opening the store/business using a key, operating the cash register, using the POS system, going into an area of the business where customers or the general public aren’t allowed, etc.

This part of the video aims to show that the person is either the owner or an authorized person who has authority over the location.

Showing the person unlocking the business door is a very important item to show in the video.

Unlocking DoorImage by author, August 2022

You also want to go to places in your business where the general public is not allowed.

For instance, if you own a restaurant, customers are not allowed to be behind the counter near the cash register or take out food. Showing this in the video is a great proof of management.

If you have a business license, liquor license, or any other official/legal document hanging on the wall, zoom in on it. This is especially important if the document shows your business name and address as shown on your Google Business Profile. (Ideally, everything should match!)

If you operate a Service Area Business, you will need to show access to any industry-specific software, open up your branded vehicle and show the equipment or tools you use to perform the jobs you do. You can also show your team performing a job at a customer’s site using the tools-of-the-trade.

Branded vehicle showing equipmentImage by author, August 2022

If you’re a SAB and run your business out of your home or out of a building that is used for storage and not accessible to customers, also take a video of the outside of the building, show the nearby street signs, and the number on the building.

Be sure to take a video of you unlocking the door.

You can also show close-ups of any business licenses, Secretary of State documents, LLC or incorporation docs, or any other official documents that prove your company’s name and address.

Just zoom in on the documents so Google can see them. Again, the business name and address must match what’s on your Google Business Profile.

Note: If you get the video verification option and are not ready to do the video at that moment, no worries! You can complete the verification step when you’re able to – like in a day or so after you’ve had time to plan out what you’ll show in the video.

Completing The Video Verification Process

When you’re taking the video, it’s okay to put these items in whichever order makes sense for your particular situation – just make sure you cover all of the necessary requirements.

Remember, the video must be one continuous video. It cannot be recorded somewhere else and then uploaded.

The video must be created using the Google Business Profile video verification process.

If you started creating your Google Business Profile on a desktop computer, when you get to the video verification step, you will see a QR code that you can scan with your mobile device.

This allows you to continue the video verification process on your mobile device – like a smartphone or tablet with a camera. Just make sure you’re signed in with your Google Business Profile email address on your mobile device.

Scan CodeScreenshot from Google Business Profile, July 2022

When you’re ready to start recording your video, tap Start Recording.

Start Recording

And then, follow the steps to record your video.

Get verified with videoScreenshot of Google Business Profile, July 2022

After you have recorded the video, tap Stop Recording. The merchant can then choose to finish onboarding on a desktop or your mobile device. (Finishing on your mobile device is probably the simplest choice.)

Click the “Upload Video” button.

Since the video is all created in the app, you don’t have to worry about how large the video file size is. (Whew!)

Upload your videoScreenshot of Google Business Profile, July 2022

Then click Done.

After you submit your video, it can take up to five days until the Google Business Profile support team reviews your video. Do not delete the video until it’s been reviewed and you’ve received the notification that your Business Profile has been verified.

If, for some reason, the video verification method didn’t work, you will see the “Get Verified” button in your Google Business Profile. You can then try a different way to verify your profile.

Once you’re done with your video, you can delete the video if you want to.

To delete the video, follow these steps:

  • On Google Search, go to your Business Profile. Learn how to find your profile.
  • At the top right, click More (the three dots) Advanced settings > Video uploads > Delete videos.

Then you’re done! You’re now able to continue optimizing your Google Business Profile and engage with your potential customers!

Video Verification: A Better Way

Even though video verification may seem more cumbersome, it’s a much better way for Google to see whether or not a business is real – or not.

This will hopefully cut down on the spam profiles we see on Google.

What are your thoughts on Google Business Profile Video Verification?

If you are interested in original article by Sherry Bonelli you can find it here

Business-growth

6 Proven Business Marketing Strategies to Grow During a Recession

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Protect your business from the looming recession with these business marketing strategies! Help ensure your business has long-term growth.

In 2022, the United States is fortunate enough not to be in a recession. However, the odds of a recession in 2023 are on the rise. Experts predict there’s currently a 30% chance of recession, and that number has doubled over three months.

As a large or small business, it’s essential to have a plan if a recession hits. Luckily, there are several recession-proof business marketing strategies that you can use. These marketing ideas will help your business continue to find success, even during a recession. Continue reading, and find out how you can fuel your business growth:

Strategy 1: Focus on customer experience

Today’s market values authenticity and excellent customer service. Around 65% of Millennials are willing to pay more for customer experience.

The best businesses know that happy customers give great reviews and spread the word quickly. It’s much easier to market your business when customers have already mentioned your company as one of their favorites. In fact, word-of-mouth marketing is a critical factor in 74% of purchase decisions. It drives six trillion dollars of spending every year.

By focusing on customer experience, you’re saying that you want to be the best in the market. There are a few ways you can improve the customer experience:

Provide quality products: In the event of a recession, customers will be even more careful about what they spend money on. Make sure your products and services are of high quality and that customers will be happy with them. This puts you in the good graces of your target market, because you’re providing a quality product or service.

For example, if you’re selling shoes, you need to make sure that the shoes are made of high-quality materials that will last for a long time.

If you’re providing a service, you need to ensure that your services are always completed promptly.

Provide high-quality customer service: Customer service is dying in America. Everyone talks about making customers happy; however, many companies fail to deliver the expected level of customer service.

You’ll never be able to make everyone happy. However, you need to make sure you’re delivering excellent customer service. Make sure that when customers walk in the door, you do everything within your power to show them you’re honest, reliable, quick, efficient and friendly.

Sometimes the best customer service you can provide is just listening. Take the time to really listen to your customers and build a partnership with them.

Always look for ways to improve: As a business, you should constantly find ways to improve while still providing high-quality services. What can you do to make your products or services better? Can you reduce the price? Can you reduce the wait time? Can you provide a guarantee on your products or services? This is the time to go above and beyond to impress your target market. Let them know that you’re different from your competitors.

Strategy 2: Improve your conversion rates with automatic emails

All businesses can improve their conversion rates. The most important thing is to ensure that you’re sending out automatic emails to your customers.

By promoting your content through email marketing, you can ensure that you’re reaching each one of your customers and getting them excited about your products.

Strategy 3: Analyze your competitors

Analyzing your competitors is one of the smartest strategies you can use. By analyzing your competitors’ content and their backend search engine optimization (SEO), you can capitalize on what they fail to do.

Strategy 4: Use social media to engage with customers

Social media is a fantastic way to get your business in front of the eyes of larger audiences. By having a robust social presence and a solid social media strategy, you can drive interested consumers to your online store.

By ensuring that you’re interacting with customers on social media and establishing yourself as the authority in the niche, you can guarantee that you’re getting the best possible sales and reviews that your business can get.

It’s also important to build a strong social media presence through exclusive content. It’s not enough to simply post your content online. You need to ensure that it’s only available to your customers on your social media sites. This will encourage a strong relationship between your customers and your brand, which will drive up your conversion rates by encouraging customers to share your content with their friends and family.

Strategy 5: Use content marketing to attract customers

Content marketing is a strategy that allows you to attract potential customers by providing them with informative and valuable content. With content marketing, you can reach a larger audience of interested consumers and drive sales and traffic to your online store. Here are some tips:

Create a blog and keep it updated: Creating a blog and keeping it updated is an excellent content marketing strategy you can use to attract interested consumers. A blog is a fantastic way to share knowledge and information with your customers, and by blogging and keeping your blog updated, you can guarantee that you’re always being current and up-to-date with the market. Blogs are also a fantastic way to build backlinks to your site, which helps influence your search engine ranking.

Publish content that inspires customer interaction: Publishing content that inspires customer interaction is one of the most effective ways to improve your conversion rates. You can build a next-generation marketing strategy by creating content that encourages customers to share their own experiences with your products.

Strategy 6: Don’t forget to track your progress

With this final strategy, you can see if your marketing strategies are working. By using a backend analytics tool, you can confirm that you’re actually seeing growth. This will allow you to tell if the marketing strategies that you’re using are really working.

There are many business marketing strategies out there. However, by using the right strategies, you can ensure that your marketing strategy is recession-proof.

If you are interested in original article by Jed Morley you can find it here

Google My Business mobile app has stopped functioning forever

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You can no longer use the app to make profile edits, communicate with customers and so on.

The Google My Business mobile app for iOS and Android no longer allows you to manage your business profile, communicate with customers or see insights. Now when you try to access it, the app says “the Google My Business app is no longer available.”

Expected. This was expected, when Google rebranded from Google My Business to Google Business Profile last November, Google told us then that Google will retire the Google My Business app completely in 2022. That day has officially come.

Now what. Google is telling you to manage your Google Business Profile in the Google Maps app or in Google Search. Google said you can manage your Business profile, view your performance, and connect with customers directly on Google Maps and Search. You can also get notifications directly from the Google Maps app, so make sure to install that Google Maps and log in with your Business Profile.

Email. Google also emailed businesses late last night saying “beginning July 2022, the Google My Business mobile app will no longer be available, and the Google Maps app will be the best place for replying to customer messages on mobile. Turn on your notifications to ensure you’re notified by email and Google Maps push notifications for new incoming messages. You can also respond to messages from your Business Profile on Google Search.”

Here is a screenshot of the email I received:

Why we care. If you were accustomed to using the Google My Business app to communicate with customers, modify your business listing, check performance, and more – then you will need to switch to using the Google Maps app or Google Search. Again, Google has told us this change is coming and even emailed us a few times that this was going to happen soon. And it has – the Google My Business app is no longer.

If you are interested in original article by Barry Scwartz you can find it here

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Local SEO Has a Surprising Impact on Your Business. Here’s How to Use It

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For businesses looking to attract nearby customers, local SEO can be a game-changer.

While globalization has significantly changed the marketplace, many businesses start building their success by selling to local customers. The yellow pages may have once been a business necessity, but online search engines have taken over. That is why local Search Engine Optimization (SEO) has become one of the most important keys to business success, regardless of location or company scale.

What is local SEO?

Search Engine Optimization has become an integral part of marketing for businesses that rely on website traffic. Optimizing content from search engines like Google helps your website rank high in search results, making it more likely for consumers to visit your site and interact with your brand.

Local SEO is simply a strategy of SEO aimed at improving search results in a specific geographical area. If your business relies on online and offline customers within a specific geographic area, local SEO can be the difference between your business surviving and thriving.

The value of local SEO

Google alone processes an impressive 8 billion searches every day, but more importantly, nearly 50% of all Google searches are made by people looking for local products and services. If you don’t have a local SEO strategy for your business, you’ll miss out on valuable online traffic. Local business owners simply cannot ignore an opportunity of this size.

Local SEO is important for online companies and for companies looking to attract foot traffic. A few decades ago, consumers may have looked for local businesses in the yellow pages or on the map. Today, they are using search engines to find contact information, location, hours and other details about a business.

Before the Covid-19 pandemic, about one in two searches made for businesses “near me” led to a store visit. If the search was made on a mobile device, the numbers were even more compelling. Nearly 90% of those queries were followed by a call or a visit to the business within a day.

Any business relying on local customers cannot afford to lose the opportunities local SEO can provide.

Utilize local SEO and work with Google to improve rankings

Marketers and business owners have a range of options to increase their visibility through local SEO. Is your brand looking to improve rankings or improve conversions and sales?

It’s fair to argue that conversions matter more than rankings, but if the business is not listed on the first page of results, conversions will naturally be low. For most businesses, rankings and conversions are closely related.

Improving local SEO results starts with improvements in relevance, distance and prominence. These are the three criteria Google’s algorithm applies to determine local search results. Your company’s Google Business Profile should also be updated to attract more local customers.

1. Relevance

Relevance is the measure of accuracy in the match between your business and the online search query. The search engine is trying to determine whether your business offers what the user is looking for. Providing clear and complete information on your website and business profile is critical to meeting these criteria and improving your relevancy.

2. Proximity

Proximity is how close your business is to the searcher’s exact location. If a user does not specify a specific location in their search, Google uses their location based on their IP address to prioritize nearby listings. Adding the specification “near me” in a search leads to similar results. To be featured in those listings, your business needs to optimize the location information on its website and Google listings.

3. Prominence

Prominence is Google’s term to describe how well-known a business is both online and offline. The search engine determines your prominence based on the offline information it has about a business as well as through online means, such as reviews and website popularity. Increasing the number of quality reviews for your business will improve ratings. Interacting and responding to online ratings also boosts your prominence.

Algorithms tend to change regularly and without notice. Like any SEO activity, successful local SEO depends on consistent effort. Many businesses benefit from expert support to manage their local SEO.

Covid-19’s impact on local SEO practices

The Covid-19 pandemic changed almost every aspect of consumers’ lives. It certainly altered shopping habits as lockdowns and movement restrictions became the norm. At this point, it is too early to determine whether long-term consumer habits were affected by the pandemic.

Throughout 2020 and 2021, online searches for products and services increased, partially out of necessity. Consumers needed online alternatives to meet their needs. Right now, evidence supports both the continued popularity of online consumerism along with a growing demand for in-person shopping experiences.

A fact that is not in dispute is the incredible hardship the pandemic caused for many small businesses. Many faced closures, staff layoffs and a loss of customers. Carefully considered and well-managed marketing is essential for a successful restart. Proper local SEO can be the difference in this restart.

Local SEO is one of the most cost-effective ways to increase visibility in a key audience within a short space of time. It may seem like a small part of SEO, but considering the sheer number of searches with local intent, business owners and marketers need to consider it a priority.

Search engines are the new yellow pages — with much more potential to transform the future of small businesses.

If you are interested in original article by Jessica Wong you can find it here

That’s how small business should look like

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Few weeks ago I went to Cracow. And while being there I found real gem. These days, big chains are taking over everything, restarants, shops. These small local places are disappearing. Finding small local shop where you can quickly pop in to get something, where you know shopkeeper and where you can have chat with them every time you go there. For me places like this are the heart of communities. Maybe I’m a bit old fashioned.

Anyway, I’m digressing. Place I’m talking about called Odido Only went there to get my tram tickets. And it was like I went back in time to my youth years. Shop is not very big but there’s everything on that small area. You want bread? They got it. Coffee? There it is. Newspaper, magazine? Yup, everythings there. Maybe something stroner? Not a problem. But don’t get fooled when I say about going back in time. This lady is accepting different payment methods. And her card terminal is pretty modern. I bet lots of people thinks that place like this was more expensive then others. That’s wherewe all wrong (I thought the same).

What was the best in my visit there? Two minutes after we went there we were chatting about eveyrthing. It turned out mrs Halinka is such a lovely person, very firendly and vey polite. Since then we were going there till our last day in Cracow. I really hope this place will be open for years and more people will be able to see how the true small business look like

7 Crucial Ecommerce Metrics You Should Be Tracking Right Now

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Don’t get lost in the depths of information available. The key is to know these seven ecommerce metrics to stay on top of your online business.

There’s an ocean of data available to ecommerce store owners.

The number of sales by day, week, month. The average value of all items purchased. Cart abandonment. Buy-to-detail rates. Funnel dropouts – on and on the list goes.

But, you don’t want to get lost in the depths of information available to you.

These seven ecommerce metrics will make tracking your shop’s success smooth sailing.

1. Sales Conversion Rate

Your ecommerce sales conversion rate is, simply put, the percentage of people who visit your online store or page who make a purchase.

To calculate your conversion rate, use the following formula:

Sales Conversion Rate

So, if 1,000 people visited your store this week and only 10 people made a purchase, your conversion rate for the week would be 1%.

Obviously, you’d want as high a conversion rate as possible.

But the truth is that the average ecommerce conversion rate in the U.S. is much lower than you think – between 2% and 3%.

According to WordStream, however, you might fare better with Google Shopping Ads.

Now, for the big question: How can I improve my conversion rate?

This is a huge topic in itself, but a few things you can try include:

  • Speeding up your product pages.
  • Upload high-quality images of your products.
  • Optimize product listings using keywords.

. Website Traffic

Once you’ve tracked and optimized your conversion rate, you can then look at bringing more people to your ecommerce store.

This is where measuring website traffic comes in.

Let’s go back to your conversion rate of 1%, or 10 purchases for every 1,000 visits. After optimization, let’s suppose this rate increased to 5% – 50 sales for every 1,000 visitors.

We can then infer that if you were to get 10,000 people to visit your site, you would also multiple your sales tenfold.

This isn’t a guarantee, of course, but it’s nevertheless important to ensure that people know your online store or page exists to maximize your likelihood of generating more sales.

To grow your website traffic, you can:

  • Promote your offerings on social media.
  • Optimize your site/store for search engines.
  • Grow the number of people subscribing to your newsletter.

3. Email Opt-In Rate

Even in today’s social media age, email marketing continues to be one of the most important tools for ecommerce, particularly when it comes to remarketing and generating repeat business.

Based on over 3.2 billion sessions, Sumo puts the average email opt-in rate at 1.95%.

Similar to website traffic, the idea is to get as many people on your email list, even if they don’t necessarily purchase your products right away.

But, unlike ordinary website/page visitors, people who sign up for your newsletter care enough about your brand to get updates on your products and services. This means they are also more likely to become paying customers in the near future.

One way to get people to subscribe to your emails is to offer something of value in exchange for your audience’s email addresses and contact information.

For example, you can offer an exclusive deal (e.g., a voucher or code) to first-time subscribers on their next purchase.

And according to The Director Marketing Association (DMA), their 2019 marketer email report revealed that for every $1 you spend on email marketing, you can expect an average return of $42.

4. Customer Lifetime Value

Customer Lifetime Value

Customer lifetime value (CLV) measures the total amount of what you earn from an average customer over their lifetime.

For example, if a typical customer makes six transactions, each one worth $30, throughout their life, your CLV would be $180.

Note that you still have to deduct your acquisition costs from this number, which brings us to the next point.

Your CLV is important because it serves as a benchmark for how much you can spend to acquire customers and the lengths you should go to keep them.

To increase your online store’s CLV, you can work on improving your average order value (more on this later) and engendering loyalty among your existing customers so they become repeat buyers.

5. Average Order Value

Obviously, you want your customers to spend as much as possible on your online store.

As the name suggests, your average order value refers to the average value of each purchase made in your store.

To calculate yours, simply divide the sum value of all sales by the number of carts.

Average Order Value

Tracking your average order value allows you to set benchmarks and figure out how to get people to spend more on every purchase they make.

Here are a few ways to drive this metric up:

  • Upsell complementary items that improve the usability of their primary purchase.
  • Offer products as a package so customers get a small discount on each item as opposed to buying them separately.
  • Offer free shipping on purchases above a certain threshold to entice customers to maximize their spending.

6. Customer Acquisition Cost

While growing your customer base is obviously important, it’s also just half of the equation.

If you’re spending an average of $30 to acquire every customer but your average order value is only $25, that means your business is still operating at a loss.

This is where measuring your Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC) comes in.

Your CAC tracks the average cost of gaining one customer, including everything from marketing and sales costs to the cost of paying your staff and hosting your site.

This will give you an overall figure, but you can also calculate your CAC by source (e.g., different traffic channels like search engines, social media, or email lists).

To bring down your CAC, you can:

  • Improve your conversion rate.
  • Optimize your advertising to spend less for every acquired customer.
  • Invest in free/organic marketing like SEO and social media marketing.
  • Invest in referral marketing to encourage existing customers to bring in new customers.

7. Shopping Cart Abandonment Rate

This metric refers to the percentage of shoppers who add products to their cart but ultimately leave your store without completing the purchase.

These are window shoppers who are considering a purchase but haven’t quite made up their minds just yet.

Shopping cart abandonment is more common than you think.

According to Baymard Institute, 69.82% of shoppers abandon their carts.

Even if your abandonment rate is roughly equal to this benchmark, it’s a good idea to do everything you can to improve it.

  • Simplify the shopping experience, particularly the checkout process, so customers can shop smoothly.
  • Use remarketing to bring undecided shoppers back to your store. This can include targeted ads and follow-up emails.

Final Thoughts

Don’t let information overload overwhelm you.

Follow these seven ecommerce metrics to keep your head above water and stay on top of your entire business.

If you are interested in original article by Jon Clark you can find it here