Back to Top

Tag Archives: promote small business

SEO

8 SEO costs that impact your ROI

Updated on by
In SEO, there are obvious costs, but also some hidden costs. Learn how to understand the true, full cost of SEO.

One of the most common questions about SEO is “how much does SEO cost?” And to be honest, it can be tough to answer. 

So many variables go into SEO costs. Some are obvious, while some are not. With SEO, it comes down to getting what you pay for, like most things in life. 

SEO is an investment but one that’s sure to pay off in the long run – if you invest correctly. 

The two largest (and obvious) SEO expenses 

The two main factors contributing to SEO cost are the people (in-house and/or the agency you hire to help you) and the SEO software and tools you invest in. This will be where the bulk of your cost comes from. 

Let’s break them down. 

1. SEO specialists 

There are pros and cons to hiring someone to manage your SEO in-house vs. hiring an agency with an SEO team to assist you in optimizing your website. I won’t go too far down that rabbit hole. Just remember that you get what you pay for, regardless of what you choose to do. 

The more knowledge and experience a person or team of people have, the more their services will cost. While that may sound like an obvious statement, paying for someone’s expertise is often overlooked and undervalued.

SEO involves a lot of strategy. No one size fits all formula can magically make a website rank better and increase conversions. An SEO specialist or team must adapt and adjust its strategy to account for unforeseen challenges. 

For example, when Google releases a core algorithm change, it can tank a client’s rankings on SERPs, negatively affecting their SEO. When this happens, it’s up to the SEO specialist to adjust their strategy to account for the ranking signals Google is currently prioritizing.

2. SEO software and tools

The other significant cost associated with SEO is the software and tools you need to do your job.

There is no shortage of SEO tools available, both free and paid. They all market themselves similarly and claim to make optimization easier. But again, you get what you pay for.

Free tools are great for a small business that is just dipping its toes into optimizing its website, but they don’t give you all the information you need to do a thorough job. Furthermore, they may not be meant for SEO at all.

A prime example is Google Ads Keyword Planner. While it’s a great tool for paid search marketing efforts, it isn’t meant for SEO. The keywords used for PPC are sometimes different from those used for SEO.

A common mistake many people make is paying for lots of SEO tools or software licenses that essentially do the same things.

Again, without going down a rabbit trail since these are the obvious expenses, an example here of the tools you need are for auditing, research and crawling. You might find those all in one suite or use separate applications to meet your needs.

Other (less obvious) SEO expenses

3. IT and web development

Rarely, if ever, does a site come to an SEO team error-free. Therefore, the first thing most SEO professionals will do is run a technical audit on your website and fix the errors they discover. They do this because they know their on-page, content, and off-page SEO efforts would be wasted on a website with many technical issues that would ultimately keep the site from being indexed or ranking well. 

Technical errors range in complexity; therefore, the time, effort and cost to fix them also vary, but they often require the assistance of an IT person or a web developer. So, that often adds to the cost (whether internal or external) you’ll wind up paying. 

4. Content creation

Another unforeseen cost is the amount you may have to pay for quality content creation. 

Having high-quality content is an important piece in an SEO strategy. After all, you have to have something to optimize, right? 

If you aren’t creating high-quality content, you aren’t going to rank or get much organic visibility. Google and other search engines prioritize providing their users with the most up-to-date, reliable, and relevant content possible. So producing content that speaks to your expertise is essential for ranking well. 

Good copy for a website ranges in cost depending on the ask and the individual or team tasked with producing it. But it’s an expense you should prioritize in your SEO budget. 

5. Visual content

Another expense that needs to be factored into your SEO costs, especially if you’re doing SEO in-house, is visual content. You’ll need to use a subscription service or invest in original imagery from a photographer.

There are “free” options available for sourcing photos. But I don’t advise using them. It’s common to get cease and desist letters from lawyers telling you that you violated copyright laws by using these “free” images – or even worse, demanding you pay thousands of dollars in damages. 

Therefore, the best practice is to subscribe to a stock image service (e.g., Shutterstock, Bigstock), or hire a professional photographer to take photos for your website. Costs for this range but add to your budget nonetheless.

6. User experience

Improving your website’s user experience (UX) is often necessary when working on your SEO. If your end goal is conversion, you may get deeper optimization of what happens for users after they land on the site and click through.

UX involves making your website a pleasant experience for the user and helping them complete their goals efficiently. Tasks associated with UX often include improving the site speed and navigation, making the page mobile-friendly, compressing photo and video files, and more. 

But as with everything else, dipping into conversion rate optimization, which often includes UX work, comes with a price.

7. Local SEO

Local SEO efforts specifically can have hidden costs associated with many outlined, including the need for UX, copy and visual content.

Beyond that, it specifically has needs like data feed service subscriptions (to scale what used to be manual work) and any map pack advertising in Google Ads (or others) to supplement visibility.

It can often feel like local search can be done quickly and on a budget. In a lot of cases, for small businesses, it can. Beware, though, that the more competitive industry or more complex the business model you have, the more it will take in tools, content and time. 

8. Additional tools

You may need some extra tools to test things like:

  • User interaction.
  • Searching for and monitoring potential plagiarism.
  • Heatmapping of your website.

These tools come with a price and aren’t necessarily something you’ll need to budget for right away, but you may find them useful later. 

What you can do to prevent unforeseen expenditures during an SEO campaign

Fair warning. These can be pricey. A comprehensive site audit can cost as much as 3-4 months of SEO services. 

A comprehensive site audit focuses on three key components:

  • Technical factors
  • On-page SEO
  • Off-page SEO or external factors

I realize that the prospect of doing an expensive site audit before you do any actual SEO work may sound crazy, especially if you’re operating on a tight budget. But the benefit of running a comprehensive site audit is that you will know ahead of time what issues you may run into when optimizing your website. This allows you to budget for these fixes now, so you’re not surprised when they arise later.

Knowing where things stand across the spectrum of search variables and needs can uncover what would be a hidden cost that you should factor into the true, full cost of SEO for your organization.

Conclusion

SEO is a big investment. But it’s sure to pay off well in the long run. Understanding the obvious and hidden costs will help you prepare your budget and measure your ROI from SEO.

You can rear full article by Corey Morris here

How To Check & Remove Toxic Backlinks

Updated on by

You’ve done everything the right way to get your website found by search engines.

You’ve created relevant content rich with keywords, added the right metadata, and ensured your layout is optimized for crawling by search engine spiders.

You should be at the top of search engine results – but you’re not.

What’s going on?

Believe it or not, your backlinks may be working against you.

The good news is that you can run an analysis of your backlinks to find the bad ones that may be bringing your website’s rankings down.

In this article, we’ll cover:

  • The basics of backlinks.
  • How backlinks can both help and hurt your SEO rankings.
  • Ways you can identify and remove toxic backlinks with WebCEO.

Let’s start at the beginning and take a closer look at backlinks, how they work, and how they affect SEO rankings.

What Are Backlinks?

Backlinks, which are also referred to as incoming links or inbound links, are connections between one website and another.

Search engines, like Google and Bing, treat them like a vote of confidence from the referring site.

In other words, the more websites that are linking to a specific page, the more confidence the search engine has in the quality of that page’s content, which in turn plays a major role in determining where your site will be ranked.

This makes backlinks a vital part of off-site SEO practices.

Link building is so important, in fact, that there is a specific type of SEO professional who is known as a link builder.

Link builders spend their entire workday building and maintaining backlinks to increase traffic and boost page scores.

All Backlinks Are Not Created Equal

You didn’t think every incoming link was as good as the next, did you?

Of course not, you’re a savvy SEO specialist.

And you already know some backlinks are more valuable than others – and not just because of the traffic they send to your website.

Because we know link quality can vary, it’s time to look further into what separates a good or “safe” link from a bad or “toxic” one.

What Are Good Backlinks?

Quite simply, good or “safe” backlinks help your search engine ranking.

Search engines keep the exact details of what makes quality links under wraps, but good backlinks tend to share the following traits:

1. Good Backlinks Are From Authoritative Sites

Backlinks from popular and trustworthy sites are very useful for boosting your search engine rankings.

This concept is known as “domain authority,” and sites with a high level of authority can pass that “juice” on to your site.

On the other hand, bad backlinks from spammy, low-authority sites can have the opposite effect.

Think about it this way, which would you trust more, a link from the Wall Street Journal or one from a site advertising off-brand Chinese prescription medications?

Search engines feel the same way.

2. Good Backlinks Use Specific Anchor Texts With Your Target Keyword

Anchor text is the word or phrase users click on to visit a linked URL. (For example, “anchor text” in the previous sentence.)

Concise anchor text using your target keyword has a correlation with higher rankings as it gives the search engines a better idea of what type of content is on the linked page.

3. Good Backlinks Are From Sites Related To Your Page Content

Because Google seeks relevant content that provides supplemental information, the search engine values links from related sites over those from un-related sites.

This helps ensure queries are answered with helpful content, rather than random links from sites with no clear connection.

So, while your One Direction fan page may be a must-visit for Harry Styles fans, linking to your used car dealership’s website from it isn’t doing you any good.

And in fact, it may raise red flags and hurt your ranking. But more on that later.

4. Good Backlinks Are Dofollow Links

Make sure any relevant, good backlinks to your site are marked as “dofollow” links.

Search engine spiders track “dofollow” links from one site to the next.

These are the ordinary links you’re used to.

Conversely, search engines ignore nofollow links, or those with explicit instructions to crawlers to pass them by.

These nofollow links are commonly found on things like press release pages and paid advertisements and are not considered when determining your ranking.

That’s not to say nofollow links without their value. Just being mentioned on a high-quality site can give your brand an awareness boost.

However, that nofollow link will not boost your rank on search engine results pages (SERPs).

Nofollow links are basically the digital equivalent of Kylie Jenner tweeting that she loves your jeans.

But for SEO purposes, they’re not doing you much good.

So, where possible, aim for dofollow links.

We’ve covered what good backlinks look like, now it’s time to examine the flip side: bad backlinks.

What Are Toxic Backlinks?

As you might expect, toxic backlinks are ones that hurt your website’s reputation in Google’s eyes.

Many of these types of links have their origin in black hat SEO tactics, unethical attempts to game the search engine algorithm to get higher rankings.

To combat this SEO cheating, Google penalizes sites caught using these black hat tactics.

How To Check & Remove Toxic Backlinks

While there are a practically endless number of ways SEO black hats will try to get over on Google, there are a few that are obvious clues a backlink may be untrustworthy.

1. Toxic Backlinks Are From Spammy Sites

Most people are smart enough to know a Nigerian prince doesn’t really want to give them $10 million, but are you just as smart when it comes to noticing spammy backlinks?

There are entire websites dedicated to selling illegal or irrelevant products and these sites are usually packed to the gills with spammy backlinks, sometimes to your site.

Not only are these annoying, but they can be downright harmful to your website.

And it’s not because you don’t want them associated with your brand – if you have too many backlinks from spam sites, search engines can penalize you, even though you may be completely innocent of any wrongdoing.

In fact, many times you may not even know that spammy sites have linked to your website.

So, it’s important to always be on the lookout for spammy, bad backlinks.

2. Paid Link Mills Often Produce Toxic Backlinks

Paid link schemes have been around almost as long as search engines, from the first time someone realized backlinks contribute to rankings.

The way paid link schemes work is straightforward: links are sold either alone or as part of a package, to provide backlinks to site owners looking for a quick way to shoot up the rankings.

But search engines are aware of this tactic.

They don’t want top search engine results to just go to whoever bought the most backlinks, so these link exchanges are explicitly against Google’s Webmaster Guidelines.

As soon as search engines discover a new link mill, they start applying a penalty to sites using it.

3. Toxic Backlinks Can Come From Forum Or Blog Comment Links (Particularly Foreign Ones)

Let us start by stating: not all forum links are bad.

Those from quality sites with established users and with related content are beneficial.

However, like link mills, if you have hundreds of low-quality links coming in from foreign discussion forums, you’ll want to disavow them before they damage the ranking you’re working so hard to build.

4. Toxic Backlinks Are Sometimes Hidden

Possibly the very first black hat SEO tactic developed, unscrupulous webmasters are still trying to flimflam search engines with hidden backlinks, which are exactly what they sound like.

By using text manipulation, background colors, or other means, backlinks are hidden from users and search engines.

This is a clear violation of Google’s policies.

It’s important to make sure any links back to your site are clear, visible, and within Google’s policies.

5. Paid Or Sponsored Links That Pass PageRank Are Toxic

Another backlinking no-no is passing PageRank to the buyer of the ad.

While buying or selling pay-per-click ads is a perfectly legitimate practice, Google frowns upon links that are paid for, rather than organic.

You should always use qualifying attributes (e.g. rel=”sponsored”) to identify these links and avoid being penalized.

Make sure you’re validating link attributes to stay within Google’s policies.

How To Check & Remove Toxic Backlinks

So, we’ve got it all figured out now: safe backlinks are good, toxic backlinks are bad. But now what?

What’s the best way to check your links and clear out the ones that are harmful?

You could spend hours combing through every page of your Google Analytics account, identifying, visiting, and checking every individual link.

Or you could do it the easy way, with WebCEO Toxic Link Checker.

The most powerful and reliable spam link checker in the SEO sphere, WebCEO is integrated with Majestic, the largest link index database in the industry, which gives us access to data from over 2,371,111,956,878 URLs, with more being added daily.

It’s easy to use:

1. Quickly See All Of Your Backlinks: Analyze Your Backlink Profile At A Glance

Once you sign up for WebCEO, you’ll get a full list of domains linking to your website in a Linking Domains report.

The WebCEO Backlink Checker helps you quickly determine how many backlinks are pointing at your website, identify common anchor texts, check the diversity and authority of linking domains, and view the ratio of toxic/non-toxic links.

How To Check & Remove Toxic Backlinks

2. Easily Discover Good Vs. Toxic Backlinks: Identify The Quality

WebCEO’s Toxic Pages report makes it easy to determine which backlinks are helping your search credibility – and which are having the opposite effect.

You can evaluate each backlink individually using analysis metrics like anchor texts, Domain Trust Flow, Domain Citation Flow, Alexa Traffic Rank to determine which links to keep.

How To Check & Remove Toxic Backlinks

3. Instantly See Harmful Links: Which Links Are Causing Your Site To Lose Rankings?

With a proprietary toxicity formula, which can be fine-tuned to your needs, WebCEO helps you spot bad links so you can disavow them and eliminate the negative impact they have on your ranking.

How To Check & Remove Toxic Backlinks

4. Remove Toxic Links & Stop Them From Harming Your Site: Disavow With Ease

It has never been easier to create, import, and export disavow.txt files.

WebCEO has integrated functionality, allowing you to do it with just a few clicks.

How To Check & Remove Toxic Backlinks

Screenshot from WebCEO, February 2022

5. Get Alerts When New Toxic Backlinks Show Up: Schedule Automated Scanning & Set Alerts

Once you’ve cleaned all those pesky bad backlinks, you want to make sure they don’t reappear.

And if they do, you should be ready to disavow them.

WebCEO has an automatic toxic link alert feature that can alert you when new links to your website are discovered.How To Check & Remove Toxic BacklinksScreenshot from WebCEO, February 2022

You can set WebCEO to automatically scan websites you want to monitor.

You can also set email alerts to tasks, so you’ll know about changes immediately.

Between managing your website and staying on top of changing SEO algorithms, you have enough to do.

You can read original article by Brian Gareth here

complete-local-seo-audit-checklist

How To Do A Complete Local SEO Audit: 10-Point Checklist

Updated on by

Are you missing out on valuable opportunities to rank, get found, and convert local customers? This 10-point local SEO audit can help.

At its core, SEO is a multi-faceted keyword, content, and competitive analysis exercise.

Local SEO, by extension, includes several specific tasks geared to establishing the relevance and authority of a business within a targeted geographic area.

Even before you can convince a local consumer your search result is the best answer, you must it prove to the search engines and earn a high enough ranking to get in the running.

Search engines like Google reference many different data points to determine who gets top billing in organic search engine results, featured snippets, maps, local packs, image, video, or other SERP features.

How can you identify and prioritize optimizations with the greatest potential to deliver converting traffic to your website and your door?

In this column, we’ll walk through an evaluation of each key facet of your local search presence and uncover your best opportunities to improve search rankings.

What does a comprehensive local SEO audit checklist entail?

  1. Keywords/SERPs.
  2. Website.
  3. Google Business Profile.
  4. Review management.
  5. Local business listings and citations.
  6. Local content.
  7. Google Search Console.
  8. Analytics.
  9. Backlinks.
  10. Competitor analysis.

These tasks are listed in typical order of completion during a full audit, but some can be accomplished concurrently.

1. Keyword/SERP Audit

The natural place to start a local SEO audit is in SERPs for the keywords and phrases you are hoping your business will be found for, in order to identify where you stand relative to your competitors and other websites/content.

This research can help you quickly identify where you have established some level of authority/momentum to build on, as well as keywords upon which you should not waste your time and effort.

SEO is a long-term strategy so no keyword should be summarily dismissed. Even so, it’s generally best to focus on those keywords you realistically have a chance to rank and drive traffic for.

You may determine some keywords are better pursued in the short term via a paid Google Ads strategy until you are able to build up your local organic authority.

There are several excellent SEO and keyword research tools available to automate the process of gathering search results for specific or topical groups of keywords and assigning value to keywords based on metrics such as search volume or keyword difficulty.

Ideally, you’ll choose a tool that will break down the different types of search features, so you can understand whether you or a competitor has secured any of this search real estate and then devise strategies or tactics to proceed accordingly.

Alternatively, you can conduct your own searches manually. In that case, do so in an Incognito Window in Google Chrome or Private Window in Safari to remove potential bias/personalization tied to your Google login, location, or personal search history.

Most automation tools have processes in place to do the same.

For those businesses also running PPC campaigns, close attention should be paid to the keywords and search terms working there.

It’s likely that top-performing PPC keywords will also be top performers from an SEO perspective.

SEO and PPC should complement each other for optimal results.

Different people search in different ways and it’s important to not limit your research to single keywords, but rather account for the various ways and phrases your audience may use to try to find you or your offerings.

Your keyword analysis and the resulting content you create should address the intent of searchers, which will vary depending on where they are in the buying cycle.

Some are just beginning their search for a product or service and are simply looking for information e.g. “Where can I find x?”, while others are ready to buy now e.g. “Order x near me.”

A broader keyword view will provide a better picture of the overall strength of your presence and where to best focus your attention.

2. Website Audit

With your focused keyword data in hand, you can now conduct a full keyword and technical website audit to ensure your site is optimized for maximum crawlability, indexability, and visibility.

A typical audit is designed to analyze the underlying structure, content, and overall site experience.

Here again, there are many site auditing tools that will crawl a website and then identify issues and prioritize actions to be taken based on SEO best practices.

A website audit and optimization can be broken down into several buckets.

Page Optimization

Web page optimization is all about ensuring pages are well structured, focused around topical keywords and provide a positive user experience.

As a search engine crawls a web page it looks for signals to determine what the page is about and what questions it can answer.

These crawlers analyze the entire page to determine its focus but specifically focus on Page Titles and Headings as primary descriptors.

Ideally, pages are keyword-focused and unique.

As such, keyword variations should be used consistently in Titles, URLs, Headings, and meta descriptions.

Google, and the other search engines, appreciate well-structured pages and will grab or create the components they need to construct a search engine result similar to the one below for “breakfast in Barrie.”

Note how the keyword “breakfast” is highlighted in the meta description.Google search for breakfastScreenshot from search for [breakfast in Barrie], Google, February 2022 Specifically, an audit will highlight issues related to:

  • Missing Title tags, or those that are too long (60 characters max) or duplicated.
  • Headings (particularly H1s) that are missing or duplicated.
  • Meta descriptions that are missing, too long (160 characters max), or duplicated.

Another important potential tag issue raised in an audit, depending on the nature of your local business, is image alt text.

As a best practice, all images should include relevant descriptive filenames and alt text, which may include pertinent keywords.

This becomes particularly important when images (e.g. product or service photos) are central to your business, as image carousels can and will show up in Web search results.

In every case, attention should be paid to the images appearing on your primary ranking pages.

Internal Link Audit

Over time, the various links within a website can become stale or outdated as content is moved or deleted.

A link audit will help you quickly identify any potential misdirected or broken links, which can create a less than optimal experience for your site visitors.

Links are likewise signals the search engines use to determine the flow of a website and its ability to direct searchers to appropriate, authoritative answers to their questions.

Part of this audit should include the identification of opportunities to crosslink prominent pages.

For example, if a page within your site has keywords that reference content on another page a link may be created.

This can have the effect of boosting both pages, provided the link logically guides users to more relevant content or an appropriate conversion point.

External links should also be considered, especially when there is an opportunity to link to an authoritative source of information.

From a local business perspective, this may include linking to relevant local organizations or events.

Pro tip: These links should ideally be opened in new browser windows, so your site visitors are able to continue on your site after they have explored any external links.

Schema Review

Featured snippets are increasingly superseding traditional organic search results in Google, as the search engine aims to provide the answers to questions directly within its SERPs.

Local businesses have an opportunity to have their content highlighted as featured snippets if they:

  • Publish highly authoritative and relevant content.
  • Use structured schema markup to tag content such as their local business details, products, events, FAQs.

An effective local SEO audit should include the identification of content within a website to which schema can be applied.

Mobile Audit

As more consumers begin searching via their mobile devices – especially for local services – it naturally becomes important for local businesses to provide a positive mobile web experience.

It will, in turn, affect how they are viewed and ranked by the search engines.

In short, websites need to load quickly, be easily navigated, and enable seamless user interaction.

Google offers a range of free mobile testing and three mobile-specific monitoring tools (Page Experience, Core Web Vitals, Mobile Usability) in Google Search Console.

More on this toolset below.

More in-depth user experience and SEO analysis can be done via Google Lighthouse, though a local business owner will likely want to enlist the help of a web developer to action any of the recommendations this tool provides.

Duplicate Content

High-quality, authoritative content is, by definition, original content.

As such, it’s important to let Google know if your website contains any content/pages which you did not create, by adding a canonical tag to the HTML header of the page.

Not doing so can have a detrimental effect on your authority and, by extension, your ability to rank.

Most site auditing tools will flag content that requires or has malformed canonical tags.

3. Google Business Profile Audit

A Google Business Profile (GBP) effectively represents a secondary website and highly visible point of presence for most local businesses.

An accurate, comprehensive GBP is critical to establishing visibility in Google Maps and organic search results.

A Google Business Profile audit should focus on the accuracy and completeness of the various components within the profile including:

  • Business information and location details.
  • Correct primary business category.
  • Hours of operation.
  • Correct pin location in Google Maps.
  • Proper categorization as a physical location or service area business.
  • Products.
  • Services.
  • Photos.
  • Offers.
  • Updates.
  • Events.
  • Appointment link(s).
  • Informational content.

The more complete the profile is, the more likely it will be viewed as a reliable local resource and be given appropriate billing in the search results.

Assuming you have claimed and are authorized to manage your GBP, you can access and edit your info directly within the search results.

Google Business Profile

4. Review Management

Another very important aspect of a GBP is reviews.

Local business customers have an opportunity and are increasingly willing to write reviews, which appear on the GBP for other customers to view and play a significant role in determining visibility in the local map pack.

Google will notify business owners as soon as reviews are submitted and they should be responded to ASAP. This goes for negative reviews just as much as positive ones.

However, we all get busy and so a complete audit should include an analysis of your reviews to ensure none have fallen through the cracks. This will also help determine whether there are recurring customer service and satisfaction issues or themes that need to be addressed.

Of course, there are also several other places for consumers to submit reviews including Facebook, local review sites like Yelp, and industry-specific sites such as TripAdvisor and Houzz.

A full audit should take inventory of reviews left on any of these services as they can show up in search results.

The search engines and savvy modern consumers will most certainly find them.

A quick way to discover what reviews you may have on lesser-known properties is to simply search “‘your business name’ reviews.”

Alternatively, here too there are several good software platforms designed to help business owners ask for and manage their reviews on GBP and other review sites.

Pro tip: Request positive reviews from all customers and politely suggest they reference the product or service they are reviewing, as this can have a positive effect from a keyword ranking perspective.

. Local Business Listing/Citation Audit

Local business listings and citations provide search engines with a way of confirming a business are both local and reputable within a specific geographic region.

It is important to have a presence in reputable local directories, review sites, business directories (e.g. Chamber of Commerce), or local partner sites.

Depending on the size and scope of your local business an audit of your listings and citations can be done in an automated or manual fashion.

Business listings and citation management tools can be used to find, monitor and update all primary citations with your proper Name, Address, Phone Number (aka NAP), and other pertinent business details found in broader listings (e.g. website address, business description.)

If you manage a limited number of locations and have the time, one quick method of identifying where your current listings can be found is to simply conduct a search on your business name.

The first 3-4 pages of search results should reveal the same.

If the goal is to understand where you are missing listing and citation opportunities, you can conduct a search on the list of keywords you have researched and want to be found for.

The most valuable directories and listing sites will be those which appear in the search results for these keywords.

It’s also important that you find and resolve any duplicate listings to prevent confusing customers and search engines alike with outdated, inaccurate information.

6. Local Content Audit

As noted, people search differently and require different types of information depending on where they are in their buying journey.

A well-structured local web presence will include content tailored and distributed for consumption during each stage of this journey, to bolster visibility and awareness.

You want to be found throughout your customer’s search experience.

A content audit can be used to make sure you have content for each of the journey buckets your audience members may find themselves in.

Informational content may be distributed via social or other external channels or published on your website to help educate your consumers on the products, services, and differentiators you offer at the beginning of their path to purchase.

This content ideally answers your prospects’ why, how, and what type questions.

Transactional content is designed to address those consumers who already know what they want, but are in the process of deciding where or who to purchase from.

This type of content may include reviews, testimonials, or competitive comparisons.

Navigational content ensures when people click through from Google after having searched your brand name or a variation thereof, they land on a page or information validating your position as a leader in your space.

This page should also include a clear call to action with the assumption they have arrived with a specific goal in mind.

Commercial content addresses those consumers who have signaled a strong intent to buy.

Effective local business sites and social pages must include offers, coupons, discounts, and clear paths to purchase.

Quality content is content your audience wants to consume, like, and share. In 2022, for many businesses, this means considering and experimenting with content beyond text and images.

Video content shared via platforms like YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, TikTok, and others is easier to consume and generally more engaging.

YouTube videos, in particular, can be optimized and do appear within organic search results.

Keep in mind, each social network includes a search function and any content distributed here should incorporate targeted keywords and hashtags to enhance visibility.

Pro tip: Make it easy for your readers to like and share your content by including visible share buttons; a simple best practice missed by far too many website owners.

While social signals are not a search ranking factor, shared content has a higher chance of being linked to, which in turn can positively affect authority and organic visibility.

7. Google Search Console Review

Google Search Console is an invaluable free resource for data related to keyword and content performance, indexing, schema/rich results validation, mobile/desktop experience monitoring, and security/manual actions.

A complete local SEO audit must include a review and analysis of this data to identify and react to strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats outlined in each section.

Website owners and managers will want to pay particular attention to any issues related to pages not being crawled/indexed or manual actions having been taken based on questionable practices, as both can have a detrimental effect on search engine visibility.

Google Search Console does send notifications for these types of issues as well as regular performance updates, but an audit will ensure nothing has been overlooked.

Google Search Console Overview

8. Analytics Review

Whether you are using Google Analytics or another site/visitor tracking solution, the data available here is useful during an audit to validate top and lesser-performing content, traffic sources, audience profiles, and paths to purchase.

Findings in analytics will be key to your content audit.

As you review your site analytics you may ask the following questions:

Are my top-visited pages also my top ranking pages in search engines?
Which are my top entry pages from organic search?
Which pages/content are not receiving the level of traffic or engagement desired?
What is the typical path to purchase on my site and can it be condensed or otherwise optimized?
Which domains are my top referrers and are there opportunities to further leverage these sites for backlinks? (see Backlink Audit below).
Use Google Analytics (or another tool of your choice) to find the answers to these questions so you can focus and prioritize your content and keyword optimization efforts.

9. Backlink Audit

Backlinks or inbound links are similar to citations but are effectively any links to your website pages from other third-party websites.

Links remain an important factor in determining the authority of a website as they lend validity if they come from relevant, reputable sources.

However, links from non-relevant or non-reputable sites can do more harm than good from an SEO perspective, and sometimes these links can be created without your knowledge.

It is therefore wise to conduct a backlink audit every six to twelve months depending on the size and scope of your website.

As with other components of an audit, there are several good free and paid backlink tools available, including a link monitoring service in Google Search Console, which is a great place to start.Google Search Console LinksScreenshot from Google Search Console, February 2022

In terms of auditing linking domains, you should quickly determine if there are any you don’t recognize or those which appear non-reputable or irrelevant to your local business.

Depending on the source, nature of the link, and the content it links to, it may be necessary to inquire about having the link removed.

An effective backlink audit has the dual purpose of identifying and building links via potentially valuable backlink sources, which can positively affect your ranking and visibility.

For local businesses, reputable local sources of links are naturally beneficial in validating location.

Potential backlink sources can be researched in a variety of locations:

  • Free and paid backlink research tools such as AhrefsSemrush, or Majestic. Identify any domains where your primary competition has acquired backlinks, but you have not.
  • Any non-competitive sites appearing in the organic search results for your primary keywords are, by definition, good potential backlink sources. Look for directories you can be listed in, blogs or articles you can comment on or publications you can submit articles to.
  • Referral sources in Google Analytics may reveal domains where you already have links and may be able to acquire more.

10. Competitor Analysis

A comprehensive local SEO audit would not be complete without identifying and reviewing the strengths and weaknesses of your competition.

You may already have a good sense of who your competition is, but to begin it’s always a good idea to confirm who specifically shows up in the search results when you enter your target keywords.

These businesses/domains are your true competitors and the sites you can learn the most from.

A recent Google algorithm update appears to signal more emphasis is being placed on results tied to the immediate proximity of a business, which means the most attention should be paid to your closest high-ranking competitors.

If any of these competitors’ sites and/or pages are ranking ahead of yours, you’ll want to review what they may be doing to gain this advantage.

You can follow the same checklist of steps you would conduct for your own audit to identify how they may be optimizing their keywords, content, Google Business Profile, reviews, local business listings, or backlinks.

In general, the best way to outperform your competition is to provide a better overall experience online and off, which includes generating more relevant, high-quality content to address the questions your mutual customers have.

Prioritizing Your Action Items

A complete local SEO audit is going to produce a fairly significant list of action items.

Many of the aforementioned keyword, site, content, and backlink auditing tools do a good job of prioritizing tasks; however, the list can still be daunting.

One of the best places to start with an audit action plan is around the keywords and content you have already established some but not enough authority for.

These are your keywords, webpages, and content assets sitting on the cusp of prominence in the local organic search results and Map Packs.

Determine how to best address deficiencies or opportunities to optimize this content first before moving onto more competitive keywords or those you have less or no visibility for, as we all know, SEO is a long-term game.

These audit items should be reviewed every 6-12 months, depending on the size and scale of your web presence, for the best chance at being found by your local target audience.

You can read original article by Jeff Riddall here

Having second thoughts about first-person branding? You should be

Updated on by

Brands and products that refer to themselves as ‘I’ come across as infantile and annoying. Think twice when creating your tone of voice.

There’s no ‘I’ in brand.

No, this isn’t going to be one of those pieces that excoriates individualism in marketing departments and castigates those who step out of the consensus culture with a version of the ‘no-I-in-team’ put-down. Brands can be built either way: in harmonious, consensual togetherness or by brilliantly ruthless lightning strikes of personal genius.

Who would argue that Steve Jobs was not the ‘I’ in Apple, at least until Jony Ive came along and made it a ‘we’? And eponymous, founder-led brands would never get off the ground without the impassioned, often monomaniacal, zeal of the pioneer with their name over the door. From the outset, and for decades after, there was an ‘I’ in Ford and his name was Henry Ford.

But we’re going to come down a few levels from the elevated dichotomies of that subject matter. Many levels, in fact, to the subterranean zones of the branding edifice, to consider a communications trope that would be an unlikely contender for serious marketing comment were it not so very annoying and pervasive.

That trope is ‘I am’ branding, where products deploy the first-person singular to declare their benefits and virtues. ‘I am a green bus’, says the side panel on a passing bus. Why not ‘This is a green bus’, or ‘Get on board our new green buses’, or ‘Look! This bus has gone green’? Why ‘I’? It’s infantilising – a copywriting language straight out of the pages of Thomas the Tank Engine.

And it’s everywhere. On the wrapper of a peanut butter bar: ‘Ta-da! I am one third of your daily fibre fix.’ On a range of cleaning products: ‘I’ll do your dirty work,’ claims one; ‘I’ll give you some sparkle,’ boasts another. On the website of a big-brand sofa retailer that gives its products personal names: ‘Hi! I’m Bluebell.’ Or Isaac. Or Jack.

Taking things to another excruciating level of informality is the message on the brown wrapper of a big block of ice that comes with a recipe box delivery. ‘Ciao!’ it starts breezily, as though it made my acquaintance way back when we were both students at uni. ‘I am an icepack. Don’t worry if I have melted by the time you receive your food. I have used all my energy keeping your food chilled during the trip.’

‘You what?’ I want to say back. ‘You’re just a sodden lump of frozen H2O that’s now oozing in my sink’ – before realising that I have fallen into the trap and dignified an inanimate object with the second-person singular.

And that gets me wondering what these brands’ preferred pronouns are. We do not habitually refer to those who introduce themselves with ‘I’ as ‘it’ further down the conversation. So, is the bus/bar/sofa/icepack a she/her/ he/him/they/them or what?

Stand out from the category

The ‘first-person’ trope is merely the latest expression of what Wieden & Kennedy Amsterdam’s head of strategy, Martin Weigel, has bewailed as “the mind-numbing, unrelenting chattiness of consumerism”. In a tweet devoted to that gripe he focused on some Innocent-inspired back-of-pack copy for a shampoo that talked about how ‘your hair is your friend’.

Perhaps I should take a cue from the ever-thoughtful Weigel to make a serious marketing point here. Before mandating a ‘friendly’ tone of voice for your brand, check if it is really what you want – or whether you’re ready for what you’ll end up with once the agency has put its stamp on it. Not everyone wants their brands to be their friends. In fact, does anyone, ever? What if your brand’s gravitas, authority, reputation – or its very category – precludes that level of presumptive chumminess?

Before mandating a ‘friendly’ tone of voice for your brand, check if it is really what you want.

As a precautionary tale here, I offer an example from the serious, often life-and-death world of medical devices. A brand that makes probes that go into the groin and up through the vascular system to locate, and hopefully withdraw, stroke-inducing clots deep in the brain addresses surgeons thus:

OPINION

Having second thoughts about first-person branding? You should be

Brands and products that refer to themselves as ‘I’ come across as infantile and annoying. Think twice when creating your tone of voice.

Helen Edwards marketing columnist

By Helen Edwards  28 Feb 2022

There’s no ‘I’ in brand.

No, this isn’t going to be one of those pieces that excoriates individualism in marketing departments and castigates those who step out of the consensus culture with a version of the ‘no-I-in-team’ put-down. Brands can be built either way: in harmonious, consensual togetherness or by brilliantly ruthless lightning strikes of personal genius.

Who would argue that Steve Jobs was not the ‘I’ in Apple, at least until Jony Ive came along and made it a ‘we’? And eponymous, founder-led brands would never get off the ground without the impassioned, often monomaniacal, zeal of the pioneer with their name over the door. From the outset, and for decades after, there was an ‘I’ in Ford and his name was Henry Ford.

But we’re going to come down a few levels from the elevated dichotomies of that subject matter. Many levels, in fact, to the subterranean zones of the branding edifice, to consider a communications trope that would be an unlikely contender for serious marketing comment were it not so very annoying and pervasive.

Marketing’s transformative questions don’t start with ‘how?’

That trope is ‘I am’ branding, where products deploy the first-person singular to declare their benefits and virtues. ‘I am a green bus’, says the side panel on a passing bus. Why not ‘This is a green bus’, or ‘Get on board our new green buses’, or ‘Look! This bus has gone green’? Why ‘I’? It’s infantilising – a copywriting language straight out of the pages of Thomas the Tank Engine.

And it’s everywhere. On the wrapper of a peanut butter bar: ‘Ta-da! I am one third of your daily fibre fix.’ On a range of cleaning products: ‘I’ll do your dirty work,’ claims one; ‘I’ll give you some sparkle,’ boasts another. On the website of a big-brand sofa retailer that gives its products personal names: ‘Hi! I’m Bluebell.’ Or Isaac. Or Jack.

Taking things to another excruciating level of informality is the message on the brown wrapper of a big block of ice that comes with a recipe box delivery. ‘Ciao!’ it starts breezily, as though it made my acquaintance way back when we were both students at uni. ‘I am an icepack. Don’t worry if I have melted by the time you receive your food. I have used all my energy keeping your food chilled during the trip.’

‘You what?’ I want to say back. ‘You’re just a sodden lump of frozen H2O that’s now oozing in my sink’ – before realising that I have fallen into the trap and dignified an inanimate object with the second-person singular.

And that gets me wondering what these brands’ preferred pronouns are. We do not habitually refer to those who introduce themselves with ‘I’ as ‘it’ further down the conversation. So, is the bus/bar/sofa/icepack a she/her/ he/him/they/them or what?

Stand out from the category

The ‘first-person’ trope is merely the latest expression of what Wieden & Kennedy Amsterdam’s head of strategy, Martin Weigel, has bewailed as “the mind-numbing, unrelenting chattiness of consumerism”. In a tweet devoted to that gripe he focused on some Innocent-inspired back-of-pack copy for a shampoo that talked about how ‘your hair is your friend’.

Perhaps I should take a cue from the ever-thoughtful Weigel to make a serious marketing point here. Before mandating a ‘friendly’ tone of voice for your brand, check if it is really what you want – or whether you’re ready for what you’ll end up with once the agency has put its stamp on it. Not everyone wants their brands to be their friends. In fact, does anyone, ever? What if your brand’s gravitas, authority, reputation – or its very category – precludes that level of presumptive chumminess?

Before mandating a ‘friendly’ tone of voice for your brand, check if it is really what you want.

As a precautionary tale here, I offer an example from the serious, often life-and-death world of medical devices. A brand that makes probes that go into the groin and up through the vascular system to locate, and hopefully withdraw, stroke-inducing clots deep in the brain addresses surgeons thus:

‘I am a balloon guide catheter specifically designed for stroke patients. Before I came along, balloon-based variable stiffness catheters brought all manner of technological constraints. I’m here to change that. With my kink-resistant construction, I can shimmy and twist through the most challenging of neurovascular procedures.’

This puts me in mind of those books that you got in junior school that started: ‘I am John’s liver’ and continued from there to tell the tale of all the clever things that particular organ got up to in a typical day. They were a brilliant way of giving you the basics of what the various bits of the body were there to do.

But do you know why that worked so well? Because you were seven. Brain surgeons, conversely, have moved on from junior school to big school to medical school to teaching hospital, and from there to hone their specialist skills in life-critical surgical practice. They might, just maybe, be ready for something a little more – I don’t know – sophisticated.

Another reason for marketer caution is a more fundamental one. Brands are supposed to stand out. They are meant to be different from the others in the category. To have their own distinctive way of being, feeling and communicating. Unless those tonal values, those distinctive brand codes and cues, are very clearly mandated on any design or communications brief, there is a good chance you will end up as a victim of fashion.

And right now, the fashion is to become the big ‘I am’. Should you find yourself on the receiving end of a version of that, my advice is to run a mile. As ever when there is a rush for the cover of cleverness or cuteness or zeitgeisty modes of engaging with consumers, the soundest tactic is to go the other way, keep improving the substantive features of the product and service offer, and communicate with genuine, rather than ersatz, empathy and perhaps a little humility too. Is everyone out there up for that? I know I am.

You can find original article by Helen Edwards here

How to design a business card: 7 top tips

Updated on by

Discover how to design a business card that makes a lasting impression.

Wondering how to design a business card? Once you’ve made your business plan, you’ve formed your business and created your branding, you’re ready to approach potential clients. There are many ways to do that and to place your business at the forefront of prospective clients’ minds. In this digital era, the business card might seem like the last thing to consider, but it’s surprising how these humble pieces of stationery have held on to their place in the business world. And if you haven’t got one, you could be missing out on leads.

Not all business cards are created equal, however, and there are a lot of poor quality business cards out there. While it’s possible for any small business to design its own cards using stock icons and order them from an online printer for the price of lunch, the results aren’t going to be very impressive. In this guide, we’ll look at how to design a business card that stands out and helps differentiate your business from the competition by following 10 key tips.

For inspiration, see our selection of the best business card designs, and if you’re looking for a quick solution, see our pick of the best business card templates. For more advice on setting up and promoting your creative business, see our guide to how to start a design business, how to improve your graphic design skills, and our tips for the perfect résumé for creatives.

01. Remember your basic designing principles

It might seem obvious but it’s worth reiterating that a business card is a piece of printed design material like any other. This means the basic principles of paper-based design apply when it comes to designing business cards. 

You should ensure you maintain a minimum size for your typography to maintain legibility and keep your key copy at least 5mm from the trim edge. Work at 300dpi for the best image reproduction and design in CMYK unless you’re working exclusively with spot colours.

Many designers also find it helps to use a grid to design business cards, as this can help ensure correct alignment and the right hierarchy of information (see our guide to grid theory for a recap).

02. Get creative (within the constraints)

You can get very creative with business cards. Experimenting with colour and texture can really help a business card to stand out, but remember that the ‘standard’ sizes are standard for a reason. A business card needs to be easy to stow in a pocket, wallet or organiser and cards designed in very different sizes or formats may be more likely to get lost or thrown out. 

There are actually a couple of ‘standard’ sizes depending on where you are in the world. One typical business card size is 55 x 85mm, but you’ll see many other sizes quoted on the web – check with printers. There are also standards in terms of the content you’ll want to include. While an image or a name alone can look bold, it’s not much use if people don’t know how to get in touch with you. You’ll typically want to include at least a business name, phone number and email address. You might also want to include a website address, physical address and social media handles depending on which of those your business has.

Even though the size and restricts you somewhat, you can still get creative with the space and work your design around presenting the essential information in a creative way – and remember there are two sides to a business card. You’ll probably put the information on one side, leaving the other side available for an eye-catching design.

Just be sure to avoid a couple of fairly common pitfalls when designing business cards. Ensure you provide a bleed as specified by your printer – this is commonly 3mm, but can be 5mm, so be sure to check. It’s also usually best to avoid using a straight border around the entire card as this will show up any misalignment in the trim if the card isn’t perfectly cut.

03. Use a quality support

Cheap business cards give themselves away immediately due to the quality of the support. They quickly crease or lose their colour and soon end up chucked in the bin. A quality heavyweight card stock is more durable and gives a much more pleasant feel in the hand, creating a much more professional impression.

Most business cards are printed on card stock, which is the most cost-effective option for printing. But if you want to get more creative (and you can afford it), you can print onto all sorts of different materials including transparent plastics, metals, wood or even slate. Just remember that a business card needs to be portable and easy to file away in a pocket or briefcase. You could print your business cards yourself. You can find letterpress kits on eBay at reasonable prices, allowing you to convert any card stock into your own business card with ease.

Another instant way to add impact to your business card is to use a special finish. Special finishes include the likes of foil blocking, spot-UV and metallic inks. While they can add a significant cost to your print, they offer the chance to create something that’s a lot more visually impressive and memorable. Different printers offer different options for finishes, so ask around to find out what they can do for you. Don’t be afraid to go to a specialist if your usual printer only offers straight four-colour print.

04. Make it tactile

A quality support and special finishes can allow you to design a more tactile business card through embossing or debossing text or designs. An even more eye-catching technique that can ensure your card spends more time in the hands of prospective clients is to use a die-cut process to remove elements from the card stock, leaving a void. You can either use a die to change the shape of your card (by rounding the corners, for example), or you can cut shapes out of the centre.

Dies are expensive to create the first time, although increasingly printers are offering laser-cut options that make it economical to create a die-cut look on shorter print-runs (check out our guides to the best laser cutters and best cricut machines if you want to print your own). There are some very creative examples on the web, like this die-cut letterpress stationery. When combined with creasing you can use the process to create architectural features in your card design (take a look at the example below).

06. Make your business card useful

One of the problems with paper is that it’s everywhere. Some people hold on to every bit of paper they receive, amassing a paper mountain, while others are far more ruthless and recycle things at the first opportunity. To avoid the risk of being recycled, it can help to give your business card a second function.

Of course, you have to be careful when you consider how to design a business card with a function since it should be something that’s relevant to your business and to your clients, and if making something useful means straying too far from the usual business card shape and size, your card might not be kept. That said, we’ve seen some very clever examples of ‘useful’ business cards, from business cards that serve as phone holders to seed packets, bottle openers and more.

You don’t want to copy an idea that’s already done the rounds, but sometimes incorporating function as well as form into a business card design can not only ensure that a prospective client keeps your cards, but also that they spend more time looking at it and more likely to remember it when they need to hire someone for a job.

07. Double-check your business card design

The final tip in our guide to how to design a business card applies to every bit of print work you do, but it’s so crucial that it’s worth repeating for business card design. Before you send your business card artwork off to the print shop (or before you start printing a lot of copies yourself if you’re printing your own), make sure you’ve double- and triple-checked every single detail. 

Make sure you’ve included the details that you need to and that they’re all correct. As we mentioned above, name, position, telephone number and email address are essential in almost all cases. We’d recommend asking someone else to look over your design to make sure it covers everything they would need (we’ve seen plenty of examples of business cards that include Instagram or Facebook icons, but don’t mention a username). And finally, check the spelling! There’s nothing worse than getting back your cards and discovering a typo in your name or email address or name. Check twice, print once is a wise adage.


You can find original article by Sam Hampton-Smoth here

Business Card Design

10 brilliant business card templates

Updated on by

The best business card templates are a perfect solution if you want to promote your creative business – whether that’s fashion, photography or web development – but you don’t have the graphic design skills to craft your own. Alternatively, even if you are a graphic designer, you might want a template to start from, and then tweak it to your heart’s content, to save time reinventing the wheel again and again.

Of course, there are a ton of free business card templates out there. However, the quality of design freebies can be variable to say the least. So it can be worth spending a small amount of money to get a higher quality of business card template. And in this article we’ll point you in the right direction.

Below, you’ll find 10 paid-for business card templates that go above and beyond the norm, and offer something decidedly different. Each of them is supplied as two editable, print-ready PSD files, for front and back. And apart from number 10 on our list, each is a standard 2 x 3.5 inch size with quarter-inch bleed. So whether you’re looking for a quick design solution or just a few ideas and inspiration, read on.

The best business card templates available now

01. Minimal Business Card template by Arslan

Business card templates featuring abstract monochrome design

(Image credit: Arslan)

If you’re seeking a straightforward business card that looks both formal and fresh at the same time, check out this business card template. Strikingly effective in its clean efficiency, it’s simple, uncluttered and classic. For most people, simply downloading it, opening it in Photoshop and swapping the text for your own details will be all you need to have a great business card design.

02. Individual Business Card template by Emilly Design

Business card templates featuring sun design

(Image credit: Emilly Design)

If you’re seeking a business card that’s minimalist overall, but has a small splash of personality to help it stand out, here’s a nice looking creation that gives you plenty of copy to add all your details. Targeted at professionals, this super-clean design offers a great way to get your information in people’s physical hands.

03. Grunge business card template by Raincutter

Grunge style business card template showing front and back of card

(Image credit: Raincutter)

In some professions, accountancy for instance, you’ll want your business card to be pretty formal and serious looking, like the first two on our list. If you work in a more creative role, though, you might prefer something a bit more eye-catching. If so, this template will certainly grab people’s attention with its raw grunge texture, while still being eminently legible and functional.

04. Corporate Business Card template by DesignSoul14

Corporate Business Card based on simple geometric design

(Image credit: DesignSoul14)
Advertisement

Corporate doesn’t have to mean staid and boring. This brilliant business card template is clean and simple, but it’s anything but formal. Instead, it has more of the feel of a gig flyer or album cover, and yet could still be used to promote any kind of business or freelance practice.

05. Visual Business Card template by Mexelina

Business card template using spraypaint stencil effect for lettering

(Image credit: Mexelina)

Here’s a design that will really help you grab prospective clients’ attention. Marrying the stencil style of graffiti with some explosive electro-colours, this design looks effortlessly cool, without looking like it’s trying too hard; a great trick to pull off. This business card template would be a good choice for any creative practice or individual seeking to look forward-thinking and on-trend.

06. Funny Retro Style Business Card template by cruzine

Business card with retro lettering reading "Hey I just met you/And this is crazy/But here's my number/So call me maybe"

(Image credit: Cruzine)
Advertisement

Want people to keep your business card and show it around other people? Then this cute and funny design will surely do the trick. With a bubbly, colourful and retro look, it quotes the Carly Rae Jepsen hit Call me Maybe from 2012. But even if the recipient is too old (or too young) to know the song, it still makes sense. And if they end up having a friend, relative or colleague explain the reference, that’s just going to make you stick in their head more. The template is available in both Light and Dark versions.

07. Audio Cassette Business Card template by Taeef

Business card in the shape of an audio cassette

(Image credit: Taeef)

This business card template is sure to put a smile on anyone’s face, and is perfect for anyone who works in the music industry, or other professions connected to audio, such as podcasters or music teachers. The main file contains two Photoshop files for the front and back. Just download the free fonts and insert your details: easy!

08. DJ Business Card template by vinyljunkie

Advertisement

Business card template featuring design based on DJ decks

(Image credit: VinylJunkie)

Here’s another great template that almost guarantees people will want to hold onto your business card, and show it to others. This design packs in a lot of visual detail, but makes it all cohere easily around one simple, powerful statement. Made “with love and passion” by a DJ for other DJs, the meaning is instant and captivating.

09. Fashion Designer Business Card template by D-and-I

Fashion Designer Business Card featuring pink button

(Image credit: D-and-I)
Advertisement

If you work in fashion and have ever exchanged business cards with colleagues and contacts, you’ll have seen a whole host of visual cliches, and you won’t want to fall into the same trap. This elegant business card template does a brilliant job of conveying a fashion theme with wit and originality. Sometimes the simplest designs really are the best. This design is available in three colour schemes and two styles.

10. 40 Vertical Business Card templates by AKaiser

40 colourful business card template designs

(Image credit: AKaiser)

If you send out a lot of business cards, it can be useful to have a variety of designs. That way you can offer the person a choice, when handing them out at physical events. You can also mail past and prospective clients different business cards over time, as a fun way of keeping in touch and reminding them you’re there. This selection of 40 vertical business card templates offers a great way to mix things up.

 

 

Original article by Tom May can be found here