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13 Local Marketing Strategies That Work

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Want your brand or offering to be found by local audiences? Here are 13 great tips for local marketing strategies and tactics that work.

You can reach valuable leads through local online and offline marketing.

You must develop effective local marketing strategies to build your brand authority and attract more customers.

A digital marketing strategy is essential, regardless of whether you are starting a new business or already have one.

Digital and social media marketing are the most crucial parts of marketing a local business since, according to Google, “83% of U.S. shoppers who visited a store in the last week say they used online search before going into a store.”

We’ll cover some of the online marketing tactics and strategies we’ve used with great success in reaching a local audience.

Great Local Marketing Strategies For This Year

1. Optimize For Local Search

Through Google Business Profile (GBP), your business will appear as soon as someone searches for your business or keywords on Google.

It is free, which is awesome.

The results will feature businesses within the vicinity of the person searching and even includes your business on Google Maps.

To start, create a profile with your company name, contact details, industry, etc.

Then, verify your GBP listing.

Once verified, you can add images and a bio, upload blogs, create offers, send and receive messages, add customer reviews, and see analytics.

Plus, it is pretty easy to update, so you always have relevant info online.

You can go one step further and set the business up with a solid, local link-building strategy.

Using citation sources such as Yellowpages.com tells Google where your company is located.

Plus, GBP has a great function that allows you to set the radius on services to a specific radius, such as 10km.

It is important to add fresh content or blog posts to your GBP account regularly.

Considering that a post expires after seven days, you’ll likely need to schedule a post at least once a week. Why is this important?

GBP posts can help drive traffic and engagement.

Do you have a sale or event coming up? You can promote anything related to the business on GBP.

If you’re not confident you’ll remember to upload a blog weekly, use content scheduling apps and tools like Semrush and Hootsuite.

As far as hyper-localized visibility goes, GBP is a no-brainer.

2. Local Reviews From Local Customers

As cautious online users, the first thing people notice is often the reviews given on the GBP listing.

A positive review or testimonial can demonstrate to local customers that you are a business they can trust.

That goes a long way in moving customers through the sales funnel towards conversion or purchase.

So, how do you get reviews?

While I don’t advocate directly asking for reviews from your existing customers – and definitely not paying for reviews – there are less direct ways of reminding customers to post positive reviews.

Got negative reviews? No problem.

You can use negative reviews as a way to gather meaningful customer information.

Not only will you get insight on how you can improve products or customer experience (CX), but you can use the opportunity to turn the negative review into a positive one by reaching out to the customer and correcting the poor experience, product, or service.

3. SEO Optimize Your Website

The next step to getting your brand and product into the local market is to optimize your website for organic search.

The first and foremost way of doing that is through keyword optimization.

While a lot of this will be intuitive at first, you will soon run out of clever ideas and need to do keyword research.

Competition on short-tail keywords is fierce, and someone who’s been around longer than you is almost guaranteed to be already ranking for it.

So, focus on long-tail, geo-specific keywords.

These are ideal because people who use long tail keywords usually know what they want (they’re not tire-kickers), and they are more ready to engage.

Those who use geo-specific keywords know where they want to do business.

So, say you are a digital marketing company that provides B2B marketing services for businesses in a specific area.

It would be futile to optimize just for “marketing” or ”digital marketing.” That ship has sailed!

Rather, create pages on the site that are location-based, niche-oriented, and have long-tail keywords.

For example, you can create a page or blog called “Digital marketing for B2B Companies in California” or “How B2B companies in California can benefit from digital marketing.”

You get the picture.

That means search engine results pages (SERPs) will show results for users searching for “digital marketing companies near me.”

4. Create Localized Content

Content marketing is a big part of attracting a targeted audience, which connects to inbound marketing.

We have found that the more valuable, relevant, and consistent your content is, the more your target audience will engage with it.

But where do you start?

Create content that solves your customer’s pain points and that is evergreen.

There’s no shortcut when it comes to good content creation. Do the research, write for humans, and Google bots will love it, too.

For this, we love “how-to” blogs, whitepapers, ebooks, infographics, videos, and other long-form blogs (more than 900 words).

That way, your content will help prospective customers find your website when looking for solutions.

In this example, when the person enters a long-tail keyword, “best flowers for weddings,” Google brings ads that match the search term.

It also brings organic results. Best of all, it creates “People also ask” (PAA) questions.

These could include, “What is the average cost of flowers for a wedding?”

Why not use these as a guide for fresh content ideas?

This kind of SEO-rich, high-value content attracts new visitors to your site and establishes your brand as the leader and authority on the subject matter.

You’ll see better results for your business by integrating content marketing into your local online marketing strategy.

5. Review Your Website’s Design

The look and feel of your website are as important as the words and content that make you findable on search engines.

However, while keywords will get the visitors to your site, your design and user experience (UX) will keep them there.

Use images and videos on your website that reference your location, neighborhood, and business so that there is a recognizable reference to your localized entity.

Also, the internet is evolving as rapidly as consumers’ needs are.

So, your website that was on the bleeding edge of design when you published it five years ago probably doesn’t quite toe the mark anymore.

It might be time for a redesign.

The most important thing to safeguard on your website is your user’s experience.

The site must be easy to use, easy to navigate, and easy to understand.

6. Integrate CRM Tool

Customer relationship manager (CRM) solutions ensure we have a tighter grasp on our understanding of our customers.

Most CRMs can integrate with modern websites. But how does your website feed prospect data into the CRM?

For one, you could consider adding a pop-up on your website.

It could be an invitation to subscribe to your newsletter, view a limited promotion, or announce a new product launch.

When linked to your CRM, your lead generation landing pages will also automatically update your CRM, such as HubSpot or Salesforce.

Not only does this feed your pipeline, but it also improves first-party data and targeting and thus makes your marketing messaging that much better.

Also, localized campaigns can be launched via your CRM.

You can easily identify and segment customers and prospects by region if the data has been captured accordingly in your CRM.

Remember, the quality of data you capture is the quality of output you’ll get.

That can be used for personalized invitations to in-person events and activations, for email campaigns that are area-specific, and so on.

7. Attract Local Visitors Through Google Ads

As I’ve always said, if you want sales, you need to advertise. Google Ads is just that.

While SEO is great for local organic search, you need Google Ads and other paid media channels to support your lead generation and brand awareness campaigns.

Google Ads is a keyword-driven, pay-per-click channel that allows you to target audiences based on keywords and location (amongst other things).

Your creative copy and solutions-driven content will help capture your local market until your SEO is in full swing.

When setting up your Google Ads, implement conversion tracking – which will help you optimize your campaigns and pivot toward optimal business success.

It also aligns marketing tactics with sales goals and ultimately supports business growth.

For example, one of our clients is a health and fitness gym.

We’re only targeting people within a 10 km radius around their seven gyms through Google Ads.

This way, we get maximum return on investment (ROI) on money spent.

8. Feed The Funnel With Remarketing

Remarketing is an important element of your localized digital marketing arsenal.

That’s effective if your SEO or Google ad didn’t do the job the first time or the customer is still in the consideration phase of the buyer journey.

Remarketing supports other, more geolocation-specific tactics when considering how to strengthen your local marketing strategies.

So, if your Google Ads campaign (geolocation-limited) or your paid social campaign (likewise, demographics-oriented) sends traffic to your site, remarketing supports these by following those visitors around after the fact.

In the end, remarketing increases conversions, promotes brand awareness, and helps you stay top of mind with prospects.

9. Get The Phone Going With Google Call-Only Ads

If you rely heavily on phone calls to generate business, then Google call-only ads could prove invaluable and ideal for localized marketing.

That’s because, as with other Google products, you can target a specific demographic in your call-only ads.

It’s also a good option if you don’t have any specific landing pages simply because your product or service doesn’t need it, and a direct phone call just works better.

One downside of local online marketing may be that you will not receive all qualified calls.

10. Insist On CRO-Optimized Landing Pages For Each Campaign

Contrary to popular belief, your home page is not your landing page.

Your home page is your home page.

It is a summary of your website with many exit points to other pages, many different calls to action (CTAs) – such as “learn more” and “contact us” – and many different focuses.

A landing page has one job: conversion.

If you’re spending money on an ad campaign, you need those clicks to work hard.

To do this, you need a landing page designed specifically for that campaign, with lead-gen in mind.

So, the tried-and-trusted format is:

  • Emotive copy that includes a pain point and solution.
  • An image that evokes a feeling.
  • A CTA above the fold.
  • Below the fold, you can have your trust queues, testimonials, benefits, and so on.
  • The footer can reiterate the CTA.

That’s it.

No buttons and links that take you away from the page.

No clicks are needed to expand sections. The only click available on the page is “Buy now” or “Submit” (or whatever the desired action is).

Rinse and repeat for each campaign.

11. Leverage Social Media

Social media can be a great way to grow local brand awareness and engagement.

For one, community groups often already have all your desired customers in one place.

Remember, you need to be active on the social media channels your target audience prefers.

It might not be your local watering hole, so you need to get comfortable with using platforms like TikTok and Instagram for Gen Z and Gen Y audiences, while Facebook is great for Gen X and Boomers.

LinkedIn is ideal for B2B targeting.

Post organic content, like status updates, photos, and videos, or run ad campaigns.

Much like Google Ads, most social platforms allow you to geo-target your campaigns.

For example, if you have a brick-and-mortar location, you can focus your social media ads on reaching all people within a 10km radius of your location.

These enable super-localized and targeted marketing tactics.

12. Video Tells Your Homegrown Story

Video is now preferred over all other visual mediums by more consumers. In fact, 95% of enterprise B2B conversions are aided by video.

Keep it personal, keep it local, and direct your video content at the customer’s point of pain that you can solve.

Your video assets don’t all need to be ads. You can have testimonials and how-tos embedded into your site or published on YouTube.

Just make sure you tell a story and that – in the story – your customer is the hero, and you are simply the guide who helps them succeed.

13. Offline Activations And Events

Offline activations and events are one of our favorite ways of bolstering local marketing.

Working in conjunction with your online activities – such as email, ads, and social – this “boots on the ground” approach yields amazing results.

Take advantage of the physical proximity you have to your local customers.

Consider loyalty cards, charity sponsorships, referral programs, networking breakfasts, and other community-strengthening events.

All of these add tremendous gravitas to your brand and allow you to connect with your target audience locally.

Final Thoughts

With so many ways to be found online locally, we are confident your local target audience will discover your products and services.

Be sure to activate and be active on Google Business Profile.

Keep your website fresh and user-friendly, and remember to regularly add content (blogs).

Find communities on social media, and create ads on Google and social platforms that minutely reach your desired audience.

Find communities in real life, and create events and activities in which the local target audience can participate.

All of this contributes to brand reinforcement.

Finally, remember always to position your customer as the hero, as you solve their pain points right where they are.

If you are interested in original article by Alex Macura you can find it here

Is social media for self-promotion over? Creatives reveal their honest thoughts

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No, you’re not imagining it. In 2022, social media increasingly sucks for sharing content and finding work. Creatives share their views on the way forward.

Have you noticed how different social media feels at the moment? More ads. More videos. More Stories and Reels. But fewer posts you want to click on. And less engagement on any content you post yourself.

Don’t worry. It’s not just you. It’s been well documented how most major social channels have recently downgraded traditional posts in favour of the Stories format pioneered by Instagram and short-form, portrait videos reminiscent of TikTok’s. But while that may be helping them sell more ads, it’s leaving creatives somewhat baffled.

“I’ve given up on Instagram,” complains freelance book cover designer Alex Kirby. “I got absolutely fed up with the lack of engagement because I ‘only’ posted photos. I wasn’t even sure it was making a difference with getting more work. And I seem to be doing okay without it.”

It’s perhaps not surprising Alex has seen a lack of involvement in his content because other creatives feel less involved in social media overall.

“The decline of interactions since the push for viral and video content has made me engage less with platforms,” says brand and print designer Matt Lamont. “Mixing posts with forced advertising has made my feed less tailored to my interests and more about me being a customer for others.”

So, how widespread are these experiences? We recently hosted a poll on Twitter and asked our followers: “How have you seen social media change since you started using it, engagement-wise? And a massive 82.1% of you replied ‘It’s got worse’, with just 7.8% saying ‘It’s got better’ and 10.1% seeing no change.

Does this mean you’re thinking of leaving social media altogether? Unhappily, 47.2% of you replied: ‘Yes, but feel I can’t’. Meanwhile, 3.3% of you say you’re definitely quitting, and 10% are just not sure. Only 39.5% are staying – which is hardly a vote of confidence in the current state of social media.

So what’s gone wrong, and how should creatives respond? Below, we reveal some thoughts, suggestions and ideas for promoting yourself and your work in 2022, as shared by the Creative Boom community. Meanwhile, you can read the full discussion on Twitter here.

1. Try different platforms

If you’ve been unhappy with your experience of social media lately, you don’t necessarily have to abandon it altogether. Many creatives have found switching platforms to be a better way forward.

Take award-winning illustrator Sravyaa. “90% of my business used to come through Instagram until this year,” she says. “But now I find that building relationships on Twitter and sharing my work on Pinterest is working best. So I’d say diversify your platforms and the type of content. Make it specific to the audience on each channel, and have a strong CTA (call to action).”

Designer Antonio Carusone has had a similar experience. “Recently, I’ve given up on Instagram,” he says. “I was posting there daily and saw little growth and engagement. The funny thing is, now that I’ve stopped, I’m growing in followers: what a weird, broken platform! Nowadays, I’m focusing instead on Twitter, where I use Typefully to plan my tweets, and I’m seeing nice results.”

Others, meanwhile, are pivoting to Facebook. “I get more orders and interaction on my Facebook business page than on Instagram, which is dire,” says jewellery designer Lindsay. “With Stories and Reels, folks just mindlessly scroll rather than interact. Maybe Facebook is doing better for me because I’m from a small community and locals know my business.”

That’s not the case, however, for illustrator Victoria Williams. “I’ve virtually given up posting to my business Facebook page,” she reports. “Engagement on Instagram has dropped way off, and it’s becoming increasingly irritating to use, as all I see are posts by people I don’t even follow. Now, I find Twitter by far the best for driving people to my Etsy.”

2. Don’t discount TikTok

Let’s not, though, avoid the elephant in the room. One of the reasons “traditional” social channels are changing so much has been the unstoppable rise of TikTok. But while the short-form video platform is best known for its young audience, lip syncing and daft dance routines, that’s not all it’s about.

An increasing number of creatives are using the platform, which now has more than a billion users, to share design and illustration tips and mini-tutorials, as well as just film their process. Right now, the most popular names include nickq83, Serena, aka Kohi Design, and @swoopnebula.

Illustrator Sarah J Coleman, aka Inkymole, is among those who’ve dipped their toe into the TikTok waters. “First, I spent some time ‘in it’, watching others, and creating rules about what I will and won’t do, what is authentic to me,” she recalls. “I’ve stuck to those rules and now have a nice little following on my channel. No dancing, no miming, no silly voices: just behind-the-scenes, work in progress and ink nerding!”

Jam and Ali, aka Hello Dodo, have been giving it a try too. “Obviously, we miss the golden days of Instagram when follows and engagement were amazing,” they say. “But these platforms weren’t built for us to market our business, so we try not to moan about them and keep showing up and having fun on our TikTok channel.”

3. Give LinkedIn a go

People don’t always think of LinkedIn as a social network, and certainly not somewhere aimed at creatives, given its ugly and confusing layout. Yet, in 2022, many are finding it useful for self-promo.

As designer and animator Neil Grunshaw puts it: “Twitter and Instagram are like busking in the hope that an A&R walks past and give you a record deal… in other words, pissing into the wind.” To him, LinkedIn is much more practical and targeted. “You’re selling to a network of professionals who may actually commission you,” he points out. However, there is a caveat. “It only works if you’ve got a network in the first place, which isn’t the case if you’ve just entered the creative industries.”

Artist and designer June Mineyama-Smithson, aka Mayumi, recently had a similar epiphany. “I started to focus on Linkedin after listening to Creative Boom’s podcast with Craig Black,” she explains. “I’d been wrongly fixated on Instagram because it’s visual, but I realised I had more meaningful connections from my agency years on Linkedin. I’m not putting too much effort into Instagram right now: it’s currently too disheartening. But when things change, I might come back.”

For others, it’s a case of using different platforms for different purposes. “I see Instagram and Twitter as a way to connect with and support other artists,” says freelance animator and illustrator Rosie Phillpot. “This can lead to recommendations: other freelancers recommend me because we’ve communicated or follow each other, and they like my work. I do the same.”

At the same time, she sees LinkedIn as a better way to connect with prospective clients. She boosts her chances in the following ways. “I ask for a recommendation at the end of a job to put on my LinkedIn profile,” she says. “I put keywords in my headline. I search ‘freelance animator’ and filter to posts to find shoutouts. And I put my website and email in my About section.”

4. Make connections outside social media

That last point highlights a broader truth: finding work via social media alone is often a hiding to nothing. There’s so much noise here that it’s easy for your message to get lost or ignored. This is why combining social media activity with old-school methods is an approach more and more are taking in 2022.

“Social media very much feels like a lottery versus the more tangible connections you can make with real-life people,” says illustrator Amy Lauren. “Even an email updating an individual person on my work has been more reliable than a flash in the pan on my social links.”

Designer Megan Vickers agrees. “Honestly, social media is a weird one in terms of engagement,” she says. “I feel like it really is a lottery because sometimes I can post the same thing on Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn, and they all have different levels of success. So I think moving to a place where you can control what is seen is the way forward at the moment, in terms of websites or Behance. Social media is great for promotion, but can’t be the only form of promotion.”

“With social media, we easily forget that we’re using someone else’s free offered facility,” points out printmaker and graphic designer Paul Wolterink. “It may feel satisfying and autonomous, but of course, we’re just padding out their wallets. So, I think it’s important to always have your own website, as a rock in the surf, where you are the dealer.”

In short, as we’ve said on Creative Boom for some time now, building your own platforms is important. Those may be subscriber lists, newsletters, or websites – but whatever they are, they’re yours alone, which means you’re in control. For more ideas, read our marketing guide for freelancers fed up with Instagram).

5. Revisit traditional methods

Many creatives, of course, remember when that was the only way to do it. “I use all of the social media platforms and have done since my first Facebook forays in 2008,” says Sarah J Coleman. “But before social media, I used traditional methods: postal promo, regular newsletters, a well-maintained ‘Mothership’ website, shows, cold-calling, personal projects and more.”

She still does today and for good reason. “I’ve always adapted and gone with the flow with the subtle but insistent changes in social media’s modus operandi, but never felt comfortable relying on it,” she explains. “Someone recently said building a business solely on social media is like renting an office where the rent doubles every 18 months.

“What’s always worked for me is direct newsletters. Written by me, and only me. Each one is considered. And always to a permission-based address book compiled across almost 30 years of working professionally. It’s my precious resource, and it’s constantly being updated and reviewed.”

Illustrator Ben Tallon tells a similar story. “The Instagram algorithm change served me with a great reminder that all of these platforms are not owned by us,” he recalls. “So, while I still use them, I have returned focus to my website, mailing lists, and developing relationships in a direct manner.

“I feel it’s important to only use the socials as secondary,” he adds. “Even if they bring direct business, print sales and the likes, it surely drives home the need to distil them into some offline record. As long as that’s permitted, of course.”

Neil Grunshaw concurs. “In my experience, good old-fashioned ‘referrals’ are the best way of getting new business,” he maintains. “In short, I tell the kids today to keep doing their cool shit but to have patience and play the long game. Social media can work if you’re lucky, but usually, there are no shortcuts.”

6. Ignore the algorithm

We’ll end with one final point. For decades, people have stricken to work out how to please social media algorithms. But nowadays, they’re changing so fast it’s hard to keep up. So instead, brand strategist and creative director Tom Berry offers this advice for getting the best out of social media in 2022.

“Focus on what you can control and the energy you put in,” he says. “Some things never get old, including helping people out, being a nice person, starting conversations with people and making friends.

“Give away everything you know,” he adds. “That might sound counterintuitive, but it’s really a win-win. You help people, become an expert, and grow an audience. Finally, don’t take it so seriously. It’s easy to get caught up in all the numbers and stats. And seeing your numbers turn red and go down can make you feel terrible. But everybody is just winging it, not just you. So zoom out; focus on the big picture.”

If you are interested in original article by Katy Cowan you can find it here

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5 PPC Advertising Lessons From A B2B Growth Marketer

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Getting started in PPC advertising? Bringing a new team in-house? Here are 5 lessons from my time marketing a PPC ad tech product.

As a primarily organic marketer, working for an ad tech brand has been one of the most amazing phases of my career.

When I joined Optmyzr a little over two years ago, I had no idea I would learn so much about PPC advertising in so little time.

Between our customers, my colleagues, and the paid search community that’s welcomed me with open arms, I’ve been more involved with PPC during these last two years than the rest of my career put together.

Like any smart marketer, I’ve been listening attentively and taking notes.

Between that and managing campaigns of my own, I’ve accumulated a relative wealth of PPC knowledge.

These are the five most important lessons from my time leading marketing for a bootstrapped PPC ad tech brand.

1. Treat Your Ad Budget Like Your Investment Budget

Walled gardens, monopolies, platforms – whatever you call them, the different places businesses can advertise aren’t known for playing well together.

Between low data visibility and shifting controls, true omnichannel advertising is not really a viable approach.

But, just because each platform’s campaigns are fenced in doesn’t make it a good idea to rely totally or excessively on a single ad platform:

  • New features (such as Google’s Performance Max and keyword match type changes) can throw off your entire advertising program.
  • You miss out on potential customers who either block/ignore ads on your platform or don’t use it in the first place.
  • Outside influences like market economics and regulatory changes can do anything from drive up costs to render a whole platform moot.

Between platform-side automation and increasingly demanding online audiences, it’s important to diversify your PPC mix if you haven’t already.

2. Don’t Bite Off More Than You Can Chew

In the quest to spread your budget across multiple channels, don’t rush to the other extreme of investing in too many different ones.

Not only will you end up with campaigns that don’t have enough money behind them, but you may run the risk of pushing your team too hard.

Since I joined Optmyzr as the first marketing hire, we’ve grown our team at a rate that’s healthy for our revenue run rate.

No one on the team is expected to put in 60-hour weeks, own 10 different channels, or otherwise push themselves beyond their physical and mental limits.

Accordingly, we’ve approached advertising (and marketing in general) with the understanding that we don’t have the same muscle as a heavily funded organization.

For example, if your entire marketing team is three people, it’s not wise to advertise on half a dozen channels.

You’ll compromise your testing and campaign efforts, with the additional cost of other needs in marketing being neglected.

In-house teams should begin by testing everything, then switch to a 1-2-1 approach:

  • 1 primary platform that gives you the best results and demands the bulk of your budget (e.g. Google Ads across multiple inventory types).
  • 2 secondary platforms for niche audiences or objectives (e.g. YouTube to grow your video audience and Twitter to grow your mailing list).
  • 1 experimental platform to test out new ideas (e.g. running stories ads on Instagram).

Then, as you grow your team, pad out each tier from the top down.

3. Brand Matters, Even In PPC

I know a lot of PPC specialists feel otherwise, but I’ve always been a fan of branded search terms for a few reasons:

  • Already some level of intent towards your product.
  • Claim space that your competitors now can’t.
  • Room to test out different offers and messages.

Branded search traffic is cheap, easy to win, and lets you capitalize on a range of business opportunities.

I’ve used branded terms to leverage traffic surges after high-publicity events, tailor offers to specific queries (like ones including “reviews” or “pricing”), and lower customer acquisition cost by shortening the time between discovery and conversion.

4. Focus On Offer, Targeting, And Creative In That Order

I earned my marketing stripes as a creative (specifically a copywriter with an art director partner), so I’ve always placed significant value on having well-crafted ads.

But the more I’ve worked as a strategist, the more I’ve come to realize that the offer takes priority.

Offers include aspects of both messaging and positioning, and most often manifest as copywriting – be it a headline, dialogue, or voiceover.

This is what allows you to occupy a specific place in your ideal customers’ minds, and play to your unique strengths rather than your competitors’ weaknesses.

As for the creatives themselves, the longer I work in marketing, the less I expect ads to follow brand guidelines or even look like ads.

Customers get defensive the moment they feel like they’re being sold to, so pattern interrupts can be positively disarming.

I’ve seen unconventional ad formats like customer testimonial videos win battles that perfectly “on-brand” stills couldn’t.

Without a solid offer and accurate targeting, even the most gorgeous creatives will struggle to convert.

In my experience, getting these three things right is easier said than done, but essential to PPC success.

Great offers can still succeed with average creatives, complicated account structures, and less-than-perfect targeting.

It rarely goes that way for weak offers presented as attractive ads in well-built accounts and campaigns.

5. There’s More To Advertising Than Google And Meta

Both platforms offer a level of reach and variety that most advertisers have a tough time ignoring.

Google’s inventory spans search, email, YouTube, and more of the internet’s most visited properties; Meta’s network includes some of the world’s most popular apps on Facebook and Instagram.

But there’s a whole world of advertising options beyond these two networks:

  • Microsoft Ads offers a lot of the visibility and control that advertisers miss about Google.
  • Amazon is a marketplace you can’t just ignore if you retail a physical product.
  • TikTok and Snapchat are great ways to reach younger audiences.
  • Spotify lets you play with audio in a way few other digital channels allow.
  • Sponsoring a newsletter or community offers consistently higher user intent even if they aren’t strictly PPC advertising.

Several years ago, I was on a team that advertised on one channel to a limited market.

Once we exhausted the audience available on that platform, all future leads were people who had either converted in the past or been marked as closed-lost.

Moving to a second channel meant starting the work over from scratch and learning the nuances of a completely new ad platform, while delivering a quantity and quality of leads far below expectations.

The Single Most Valuable Trait In PPC And Marketing

Sometimes I remember what digital marketing and PPC advertising looked like in 2010 when I started my career, and I realize that not a single person at the time could have predicted what it looks like today.

Nearly every best practice – many of them focused on meeting targets and nothing else – has given way to ones more focused on automation, user experience, and accessibility.

If you told 2012 me that gating a blog would one day be frowned upon, he would have laughed.

With how quickly our industry changes, adaptability is the single most important trait to cultivate.

Being bonded to a single ad platform, format, technique, strategy, or mindset can stagnate your progression as a marketer without you even realizing it.

Then one day, you realize everything around you has changed and everyone but you has turned the playing field in their favor.

Across all my conversations with PPC strategists and account managers – agency and in-house – this may be the single piece of advice I hear consistently and repeatedly: Adapt or be replaced.

If you are interested in original article by Ashwin Balakrishnan you can find it here

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TikTok Shares Marketing Tips and Advice in New Video Overview

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Looking to integrate TikTok into your holiday campaigns?

This could help – TikTok has published a new video overview which looks at key brand and marketing tactics on the platform, and in particular, how brands can partner with creators to help maximize their messaging.

The video, entitled ‘Do You Speak TikTok?’, is hosted by train enthusiast and TikTok star Francis Bourgeois, who looks at what people come to TikTok for, what they’re seeking from brands in the app, and how businesses can use these key trends to maximize their TikTok marketing efforts.

Bourgeois says that TikTok has provided him with a means to explore and share his passions, in his own way, which has since led to him working on brand campaigns for Gucci, Spotify, ASOS and more.

Based on this experience, Bourgeois offers four key tips for brands working with creators:

  • Let them express what makes them them’ – As has been reiterated by various influencers and brands that have run influencer campaigns, you need to choose your creative partners based on brand match and suitability – but then let the creators give their creative take on the content, without too many restrictions or directions. If you want stale brand messaging, you don’t need creators – it’s their nous and audience understanding that they bring to the table.
  • ‘Collaborate, but never dictate’ – As above, being too prescriptive doesn’t enable you to maximize the value of creator content, and will likely limit the results of your subsequent campaigns.
  • ‘Tap into their own style and strength of content’ – Bit of a theme here, huh? I wonder what bad experiences Bourgeois has had to come to these conclusions.
  • ‘TikTok users come to be entertained’ – Wrapping up the above points (which are really just one big point), Bourgeois says that TikTok users are not on the app to make connections as such, or follow brand pages for the latest updates. TikTok is an entertainment platform, and as such, you need to be providing entertaining content that leans into that demand.

Bourgeois then further explores some of the key trends in TikTok usage, including music, and how brands should look to utilize sound in their clips.

On this, the video also includes an interview with musician Lady Leshurr, who discusses how TikTok has helped her grow her fan base, while also facilitating her own commercial partnerships.

Lady Leshurr says that ‘uniqueness’ is the key selling point of the platform, with creative, interesting takes helping to drive better performance on the platform.

The final section of the video includes an interview with creator Dannero, who discusses the importance of visual effects and action in TikTok clips.

There are some interesting notes here – maybe nothing ground-breaking, as you’re probably well aware of most of the trends and notes highlighted. But it could help to get you thinking about your TikTok marketing approach, and what elements you should look to include in your videos, or how you should go about partnering with creators.

You can check out the ‘Do You Speak TikTok?’ video here or via the embed above.

If you are interested in original article by Andrew Hutchinson you can find it here

linkedin-top-marketing-companies

LinkedIn Lists This Year’s Top 25 Marketing & Advertising Companies

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LinkedIn publishes a new report that lists the top 25 com

LinkedIn lists the top 25 companies in the marketing and advertising industry in a new report that could be a valuable resource for job seekers.

The report aims to highlight the ‘best workplaces to grow a career’ in 2022.

Companies are chosen based on a methodology that looks at LinkedIn data across seven pillars:

  • Ability to advance
  • Skills growth
  • Company stability
  • External opportunity
  • Company affinity
  • Gender diversity
  • Educational background

LinkedIn’s data illustrates the demand for professionals with experience in search engine optimization. Within the top 10, there are three companies where the most notable skills are related to SEO.

In this article I’ll highlight the most relevant data for search marketers, followed by a skimmable list of all the top 25 companies.

Top Companies For People With SEO Skills

LinkedIn’s list of top 25 companies in marketing and advertising includes three that are top employers for SEO-related jobs.

At number two on the list, the most notable skills of workers at Merkle include web analytics, Google Data Studio, and PPC advertising.

Power Digital Marketing, at number six on the list, hires a notable number of search engine optimization specialists.

SEO, Google Analytics, and social media marketing are the most notable skills among employees at Publicis Health, which is number 10 on the list. Search Engine Marketing Analyst is also the most common job title.

As LinkedIn’s report only includes companies with at least 500 employees, this list excludes smaller firms that may be considered top workplaces for SEOs.

LinkedIn’s Top 25 Companies In Marketing & Advertising

Below is the complete list of companies LinkedIn recognizes as the top workplaces in the marketing and advertising industry. It’s listed by company name followed by most common job titles.

  1. Havas Media Group: Media Planner, Media Supervisor, Investment Associate
  2. Merkle: Search Engine Marketing Analyst, Account Manager, Senior Analyst
  3. VMLY&R: Creative Director, Engagement Director, Account Manager
  4. Criteo: Account Strategist, Account Executive, Software Engineer
  5. Spark Foundry: Media Associate, Strategy Associate, Senior Analyst
  6. Power Digital: Marketing Strategist, Account Manager, Search Engine Optimization Specialist
  7. Quotient Technology: Customer Success Manager, Campaign Manager, Sales Director
  8. PHD: Strategy Supervisor, Media Strategist, Associate Media Director
  9. Digitas Art: Account Executive, Art Director, Producer
  10. Publicis Health: Search Engine Marketing Analyst, Account Manager, Pharmaceutical Sales Representative
  11. Area 23: Account Supervisor, Producer, Associate Creative Director
  12. RPA: Account Coordinator, Account Executive, Media Planner
  13. Intouch Solutions: Account Manager, Project Manager, Marketing Coordinator
  14. Digitas North America: Data Analyst, Account Manager, Art Director
  15. Horizon Media: Brand Strategist, Digital Media Planner, Strategy Supervisor
  16. Spectrum Reach: Account Executive, Account Planner, Local Sales Manager
  17. Ogilvy: Account Executive, Art Director, Copywriter
  18. Octagon: Account Executive, Event Specialist, Group Director
  19. McCann Workgroup: Account Executive, Art Director, Copywriter
  20. Starcom: Media Associate, Senior Analyst, Strategy Supervisor
  21. Saatchi & Saatchi: Account Executive, Art Director, Copywriter
  22. Walmart Connect: Partnerships Manager, Campaign Manager, Account Manager
  23. WPP: Researcher, Executive Assistant, Information Technology Operation Manager
  24. 360i: Media Manager, Account Manager, Art Director
  25. DDB: Account Executive, Art Director, Copywriter

LinkedIn notes nearly all of the above companies are hiring. For more information, including links to available job openings, see the full blog post.

If you are interested in original article by Matt G. Southern you can find it here

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4 Ways To Use AI Right Now In Your Marketing Program

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Learn how to automate all kinds of tasks with AI and use it as an assistant to level up your marketing activities.

In my last article, we saw that artificial intelligence is getting better and better at answering our questions, regardless of the subject matter or the sector.

Using GPT-3 technology, I demonstrated that an AI can successfully pass an SEO multiple-choice test as well as solve SEO case studies.

There are other, even more advanced, technologies, such as Deepmind’s Gopher, which outperform GPT-3 in the following fields: Humanities, social sciences, medicine, science, and math.

The following graph highlights the accuracy of the answers provided by Gopher, UnifiedQA, GPT-3, and a human expert.

Depending on the subject, we can see the narrow gap between the level of the AI and that of an expert.

This also suggests that the AI could potentially exceed the level of a non-expert person.

Performance on the Massive Multitask Language Understanding (MMLU) benchmark broken down by categoryImage from Deepmind, June 2022

Presently, AI can be a useful supporting resource for many marketing topics.

Let’s take a look at how to work with AI and more importantly, how to integrate it into your business.

4 Ways To Interact With An AI Tool

We will focus on the main methods of interaction to successfully set up the best AI-human combination.

1. Using Your Web Browser

The most interesting kind of interaction is to plug the AI into your back-office or into your web browser with a Chrome plugin.

There are numerous potential applications, as you will be able to help your users with advanced projects like document classification, writing assistance, meta-tag generation, text extraction, and even suggesting new topics.

You can connect the AI to your tools via a simple Javascript call asking it to perform specific tasks.

Below is an example of a JS integration with GPT-3.

The example is oversimplified to show you that with 20 lines of code and the appropriate instructions, you can easily connect a language model like GPT-3.


var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
xhr.open("POST", 'https://api.openai.com/v1/engines/text-davinci-002/completions');

xhr.setRequestHeader("Content-Type", "application/json");
xhr.setRequestHeader("Authorization", "Bearer sk-RkXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX");

xhr.onreadystatechange = function () {
if (xhr.readyState === 4) {

if (xhr.status==200){
var data=xhr.responseText;
var jsonResponse = JSON.parse(data);
answerGPT3 = jsonResponse["choices"][0]['text'];
console.log(answerGPT3);
}
else {
console.log('API error');
console.log(xhr.responseText);
}
}};


var prompt = "List 50 concepts about … "

var data = `{
"prompt": "PROMPT",
"temperature": 0,
"max_tokens": 256,
"top_p": 1,
"frequency_penalty": 0,
"presence_penalty": 0
}`;

data = data.replace('PROMPT', prompt)

xhr.send(data);

If your back-office supports Javascript and you have seasoned developers, integrating advanced AI features has never been easier.

In order to test this initial connection, create a Chrome plugin to evaluate an AI on its capacity to correctly respond to certifications designed for experts.

To do this, use a Chrome plugin that allows optical character recognition to capture any kind of text.

Then, leverage a separate Chrome plugin that modifies a page’s CSS  to make the page as understandable as possible.

In an example exercise, we assigned each answer of a multiple-choice test to a corresponding letter.

Then, with the previous 20 lines of code, we sent the instructions to the AI to generate the results in a text field.

With this program, called “Asimov’s tests,” the AI managed to pass several certifications.

I then tested the AI on the subject of medical science and it attained scores of more than 60%, without any previous training in a specific discipline.

This confirms that by choosing your subject correctly, the results produced by the AI can strongly help your teams to improve day-to-day work.

SEO assessment from LinkedInImage from LinkedIn, June 2022

2. Using Your Data Visualization Tools

Over the past few months, tools that generate documentation or facilitate code writing have started to appear.

One remarkable use case is to simply generate dashboards or SEO tools with instructions.

There are now open source tools like Streamlit that have very advanced components in Data Visualization or Data Manipulation.

By providing the appropriate instructions, it is easy to request the generation of an app that interacts directly with your data.

For example, you can generate a web application with a complete interface and functional code.

This practice is quite recent, because we use language models that are exclusively fed with computer code. And again, the results are quite impressive.

In the following graph, you can see all the most popular code generators and the data with which they were created.

  • CodeParrot: 50 GB.
  • GPT-3 Codex: 159 GB.
  • InCoder: 216 GB.
  • PolyCoder: 249 GB.
  • AlphaCode: 715.1 GB.
  • CodeGen: 1.38 TB.

It is possible to generate applications in many languages; the main ones are Java, C, JS, and PHP.

most popular code generatorsImage via Huggingface.co, June 2022

Whether you’re a beginner or an expert, I encourage you to give it a try – as the AI can create your SQL query or your graphs in a matter of seconds.

Practical use is important if you want to get better at using your favorite tools.

3. Using A Chatbot

You can also create a chatbot to answer very specific questions by clearly specifying what role it should play in the instructions.

Here, I ask the chatbot to respond as if it were a doctor, while also using a touch of kindness and humor.

chatbot answerScreenshot by author, June 2022

AI-based chatbots can therefore provide personalized advice and recommendations based on customer preferences. Don’t hesitate to tailor the AI to respond in a particular manner.

A great example is that of Danny Richman, who created an AI version of Google’s John Mueller, called MuellerBot.

This bot builds on the above principle to answer SEO questions as if John Mueller himself were answering them.

It’s both fun and unsettling, as the answers can be quite accurate.

MuellerBotImage from Danny Richman, June 2022

4. Using An AI Assistant Program

Lastly, AI assistants for SEO are programs that run in the background and apply SEO fixes if a page is poorly constructed or has classic errors.

The first such applications date back to 2016, when Facebook was implementing bug auto-fixes with Getafix.

Based on all the bugs fixed in the past, the assistant prepares correction templates that are applied and reviewed by a human before being rolled out.

This is very applicable in SEO, where we know that concerns about meta tag titles, descriptions, pagination, and links are typical problems.

Facebook code baseImage from engineering.fb.com, June 2022

To do this, you can use GPT-3 in edit mode and modify the SEO pages using the appropriate instructions.

Below are my instructions:

  • Add a title with an H1 tag at the beginning of the text.
  • Add an <a href> link to the most important word in the body of the text.
  • Create useful outlinks at the end of text by using <ul><li>.
  • Add a YouTube video in the body of the text.
  • Put the top five concepts in bold.

modifying seo pages with AIScreenshot from OpenAI, June 2022

If we study the generated text, we can see that the results are excellent: The H1 title sums up the article, the words in bold are accurate, and the YouTube video and outbound links are relevant to the theme.

generated text using AIScreenshot from OpenAI, June 2022

In short: Your AI assistant can save you a lot of time.

Just a note: The links are all dummy links, but you can connect everything to a link database and use mapping tables to replace LINK1 with a link in your database or CSV file.

Now, you can appreciate the potential of automating these types of tasks.

Now that you know the different ways of interfacing a language model with your existing tools, don’t hesitate to implement the method(s) that works best for you, such as:

  • Chrome Plugin.
  • Directly into your CMS.
  • Via a chatbot.
  • Data visualization.
  • AI Assistant.

If you are interested in original article by Vincent Terrasi you can find it here