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Why advertising will never die

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Advertising’s not dead, it’s not dying and no one’s going to kill it any time soon. It’s never been more alive, so instead of taking aim, let’s be dead proud of it.

People constantly declare that advertising’s dead. Fast Company recently claimed David Droga wants to kill it. Elon Musk said Tesla doesn’t do it. Jeff Bezos said only unremarkable brands need it.

Why do so many people do advertising down, even from within the industry? It’s a thriving global business that’s never made a bigger global economic impact.

The idea that advertising’s dead or dying is bizarrely persistent, given it can be countered with just three words: Alphabet, Meta, Amazon. Their combined revenue from advertising was around $240bn in 2021.

If Netflix also joins the party, and with Apple also having a fast-growing ad business, the FAANG flush will be complete (substituting the F of Facebook and G of Google for their respective owners). For the first time ever, a handful of the world’s very largest, most powerful companies are, or at least include, significant advertising businesses.

So, if your metric is commercial success, advertising has never been more alive. Which means anyone claiming advertising’s dead, dying or needs to be killed is firing blanks.

Why the idea’s so persistent

The ‘advertising is dead’ trope actually appeals to a pretty broad church, which probably goes some way to explaining its longevity.

Many are nostalgics with a rose-tinted view of the past, lamenting a perceived decline in the creative quality and emotional impact of the industry’s output. They tend to be creative agency veterans disappointed with the changes they’ve seen in the industry since the 90s. For them, the current commercial success of the industry has come at too high a cost to the industry’s creative soul. They perceive their industry as having been under attack from outside forces and having been changed beyond all recognition. Far from being evidence of its vitality, for them, the three corporations mentioned above are partly to blame for its demise.

But the ‘advertising is dead’ line is probably more commonly deployed by people hyping up the dawn of a new era and new technologies. What unites both groups, whether they’re mourning advertising’s loss or dancing on its grave, is a belief that technology is responsible.

Much of it is really just lazy headline writing. The standard headline in the genre is actually ‘Advertising as we know it is dead’ or the classic QTWTAIN (question to which the answer is no) ‘Is advertising dead?’. Often what these articles actually go on to say is ‘TV advertising has a smaller share than it used to and other advertising channels like X are growing’. So it’s often just clickbait from people who are signalling they’re modern, innovative and disruptive…with some newer, shinier kind of advertising to sell you.

You could argue it’s just a harmless sales trick. But it’s a sales trick that’s been repeated so frequently that the word ‘advertising’ has collected a ton of baggage. Baggage that’s shaped perceptions that it’s old-fashioned, on its way out, wasteful, inefficient and ineffective. So not harmless at all.

The new platforms had new forms of advertising to sell. New types of agencies and consultancies emerged to help brands take advantage. Existing agencies wanted to show they were keeping up without looking out of date. Individuals had careers to protect and couldn’t risk looking like dinosaurs. We’ve all in some way been complicit in depositioning our core product. I know I’ve been guilty of it.

The people with new kinds of advertising to sell created an imaginary world called ‘traditional’ advertising. An old-fashioned and inefficient method of producing and distributing advertising, made by old-fashioned ‘legacy’ companies, used by old-fashioned brands, bought by old-fashioned marketing people.

We all bought into a related narrative about a golden age of advertising in the 20th century, led by the glamorous, cool, creative geniuses of the ‘Madmen’ era, and the idea that this has now been replaced in the 21st by the left-brained, data-driven types of the ‘Mathmen’ era. Leaving aside the stereotyping, the problematic terminology and that any talk of a golden age in any field should always be treated with scepticism, it’s a compelling narrative with a kernel of truth, but it’s ultimately a false dichotomy. Has the proportion of ‘creative’ people in our industry really shrunk? Possibly. But have we all gone from being Madmen to Mathmen? Of course not.

Social media was initially framed as a way to help brands reduce their dependence on costly and wasteful advertising, by allowing brands to tap into communities of followers and reach more people for free. This essentially anti-advertising stance of course had to evolve as the platforms developed their ad products and adapted their algorithms. Social media became less ‘social’ and more ‘media’.

With ‘Don’t make ads. Make TikToks’, TikTok is playing a similar game – using a disruptive anti-advertising stance to advertise its ad products to ad agencies and advertisers.

TikTok’s ad campaign aimed at brand marketers

From this alone you can see how tainted the word ‘advertising’ and all its derivations have become. It would seem bizarre to anyone outside the industry, but even using the word advertising can sometimes feel like it sends out the wrong signals. We so often substitute it for alternatives like comms, campaigns, film, video, content, copy and of course the now ubiquitous asset. Anything but ‘ad’. Maybe we need to try to use that simple, useful, truthful little word a little more often?

Musk and Bezos on advertising

So far I’ve mostly been describing the collateral damage the industry has managed to inflict on itself from the inside. But just as damaging is how similar themes have been picked up beyond adland.

In the world of tech startups, word of mouth and virality are so highly prized that a reliance on advertising for growth has come to be seen as a weakness, a sign that a company hasn’t quite got the X factor, a tax on a poor product. In this environment, proclaiming you’re fundamentally opposed to advertising has become a way to promote your genius and the brilliance of your product to investors. A way of saying “we’re so smart that our innovation will earn us an outsized share of attention in the marketplace – we don’t need to do something as dumb as paying for ads”.

Debates about whether Tesla does actually pay for advertising or not usually come down to how you define ‘paying for advertising’, whether very narrowly (eg paying for TV spots or search ads), or very broadly (paying tens of millions of dollars to fire a product into space, place it in front of the camera and livestream the results to the entire planet).

If you define it broadly, as something like ‘the monetisation of attention’, Musk, already the world’s richest person and perhaps its greatest showman, is ironically a far more archetypal ad person than his CEO counterparts Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckerberg, Sunder Pichai and Tim Cook – all in the ad business but not exactly ad people. Only time will tell if he can continue to support his position on paid advertising as Tesla’s strong grip on the EV market slips.

Whether Musk pays for advertising may be arguable, but Bezos’s U-turn is unarguably one of the greatest stories we have for the continued value and vitality of advertising:

  1. Bezos makes a famous and influential denunciation of advertising.
  2. He learns the value of advertising from Amazon’s own data and changes his mind.
  3. Amazon becomes one of the largest (and best) global advertisers.
  4. Amazon builds one of the world’s largest ad businesses.

Musk and Bezos are outliers. And yet, many brands continue to take inspiration from them by making overt rejections of advertising, often as a way to get attention and proclaim their genius in their early days. Similar claims from brands including Monzo and Brewdog were both later reversed when they grew and advertising was needed to help take growth to the next level. In fact it seems like there’s an immutable law of modern marketing that every vociferous rejection of advertising is later met with an equal and opposite endorsement of it.

Musk may not ‘pay’ for ad space, but he certainly has a deep understanding of one of its most valuable potential outcomes, fame. Many advertisers understand advertising but very few really understand fame. And unless you’ve got the same nose for fame as Musk, paying for attention is likely what you’re going to need to do to achieve it.

So it’s not just social media that’s guilty of deploying a kind of ‘bait and switch’ – claiming to be anti-advertising but then reversing their position when they need to make the commercials work – it’s a pattern that’s constantly being repeated by platforms, agencies and advertisers as they mature.

Let’s not do advertising down, let’s stand up for it and celebrate it

The ‘advertising is dead’ myth is especially bizarre because advertising has never been more alive. We have never had a wider, more varied array of options and opportunities available to us. But as an industry we often seem a bit embarrassed, even ashamed of what we do.

How the advertising industry uses the power of human imagination for commercial impact should be something we’re all in awe of. We’ve created commercially viable processes to harness human creativity, craft and design skills. We’ve developed the technology to distribute the output across billions of screens. When done right, our product can attract and keep people’s attention, entertain and move people, communicate powerful ideas, create indelible memories, and influence consumer behaviour both now and in the future.

Paid advertising in its huge variety of forms continues to provide a consistent, regular, controllable way of getting a company’s core message in front of new audiences that no other marketing communication can match.

Companies have many options open to them to help reduce costs and do things more efficiently, but few growth levers. Advertising is one and it’s proven. In fact there’s arguably no more researched, picked-over and proven discipline amongst all the different kinds of commercial activity most companies do.

The excellent work of Grace Kite and others in building the ARC database, a meta-analysis of hundreds of real-world case studies from companies of all sizes, categories and using all channels, shows advertising today returns an average £3.80 revenue for every £1 spent. IPA Effectiveness award winners return more, £13 revenue for every £1 spent, but they’re outliers, the very best of the best.

Advertising’s naysayers invariably have ulterior commercial motives for undermining perceptions of what it can do. It’s rare that they’re making any significant or serious point that’s in any way testable or backed up by data as robust as this.

Global advertising spend in 2021 was around $689bn and is forecast to reach $850bn by the end of 2024. Deloitte’s calculation of the overall economic contribution of advertising suggests that every $1 spent on ads generates $6 in broader economic impact. Which means advertising’s economic impact could be around $4tn annually. Roughly equivalent to the GDP of Japan or Germany. The role we play in driving the economy, and therefore society, forward is something we should be proud of. We often highlight advertising’s societal impact when talking about social purpose, but advertising’s economic impact alone should be a sufficient source of pride.

That $689bn would have been spent on trillions of ad impressions. Never have more ads been served to more people, more often. It probably doesn’t help advertising’s ‘brand image’ that they’ve also never been shorter, viewed on smaller screens, and attended to for shorter amounts of time. The shop window for our wares has definitely got smaller, less distinctive and less enticing (although with Netflix potentially joining the party, this direction of travel could be about to change). But that’s a technical issue that our ingenuity and creativity as an industry will overcome.

Could advertising be ‘better’ today? Of course. But everything can always be better. Are there big problems that need to be fixed in today’s advertising ecosystem? Of course. But are advertising’s problems existential? Of course not.

Advertising will be with us forever

When you take a much broader historical view of advertising, it reveals that – despite the peaks and troughs, the new channels emerging and existing ones evolving – advertising as a percentage of GDP always tends to stay remarkably constant over time. For decades ad spend has hovered around 1% of GDP in the US. Its growth mirrors the growth in the economy. It’s basically a historical constant. Wherever there are eyeballs, there will be advertising.

If you are interested in original article by Tom Roach, you can find it here

McDonalds-French-Fry-Crosswalk-Malaysia

This McDonald’s marketing stunt is total genius

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Ah, McDonald’s. The fast-food company probably has some of the most iconic branding in the world. And what happens when you’re the most famous restaurant in the world? Well apparently, you can completely take over entire roads in the capital of Malaysia. 

That’s right, in a PR stunt, McDonald’s has taken over the roads in the middle of the famous Golden Triangle in Kuala Lumpur. The fast-food brand has transformed the crosswalks to look like huge McDonald’s fries – and it’s genius. Loving this marketing stunt? Make sure you check out our roundup of the best examples of billboard advertising.

Advertising agency, Leo Burnett Malaysia, came up with the fry-themed crosswalk. But the look isn’t just a clever ploy to make potential customers’ mouths water – the design also celebrates the 40th anniversary of the first-ever McDonald’s to open in Malaysia back in 1982. 

The mega fries took over seven months to finish, but the Malaysian government are hoping that it’ll pay off as it becomes an Instagrammable tourist trap in the capital city. This quirky crosswalk reminds me of that 3D zebra crossing in Iceland that was painted to look as though it was floating.

This isn’t the first time we’ve seen McDonald’s pull out all the stops for its branding. A few weeks ago, McDonald’s Norway released a series of brilliantly unappetising print ads. And back in October, we looked at McDonald’s brilliant Halloween print ads.

If you’re feeling inspired by all this advertising talk, then why not download Photoshop and have a go at creating your own? Or if you’d just like to have a look at some more great advertising examples, then make sure you check out our roundup of the best print ads of all time. 

Amazon SEO: A Comprehensive Guide For Sellers

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How can sellers stand out among the competition on Amazon? Find out in this comprehensive guide to doing your own Amazon SEO!

In digital marketing, we talk a lot about what you need to do for your website and how to make it SEO-friendly for users and search bots.

But how much do you know about Amazon SEO?

If you’re an ecommerce business and you’re not on Amazon in 2022, you may not be hitting your sales potential.

Amazon’s a powerhouse, a workhorse, an old reliable when it comes to e-commerce, as most people should be aware of by now.

Everyone wants to get their products on Amazon because that’s where their audiences shop.

And those audiences shop the platform quite a bit.

Amazon generates about $4,722 every second, or about $17 million an hour. The sales giant closed out last year with $469.8 billion in net sales, up 22% over 2020.

That’s why sellers want a piece of the action, and why it can be so difficult to rank your products on Amazon’s results pages.

As with your website, though, you can practice Amazon SEO to give your products a boost.

It’s all about understanding the algorithm, what shoppers are searching for to find what they need, and how you can outperform your competitors.

Here’s a comprehensive guide to Amazon SEO for sellers.

How Amazon’s A9 Algorithm Works

Before we can talk about Amazon SEO and how you can optimize your product listings, it will help to understand how Amazon’s A9 search algorithm works.

It’s similar but not identical to Google’s.

One main difference?

Amazon queries are only commercial, rather than navigational or informational as with Google.

Think about it simply.

You make a search. A9 knows you want to buy whatever you searched.

It matches the query to a group of relevant products, and you are shown those products on a series of pages.

How does Amazon even select those particular products, though?

Again, think about it like Google’s algorithms, but exclusively for ecommerce.

The factors Amazon considers for rankings include:

  • Positive customer reviews (better products will sell more and make more money for Amazon).
  • Historical sales.
  • Relevant keywords included in the product listing.
  • The right prices (not too high, not too low, based on the competition).

It’s important to note here that while the algorithm is always looking for relevance based on a query, historical data matters a lot, too, as pointed out in the above list.

The results that have pleased customers in the past are likely to please customers in the future.

New sellers on Amazon are therefore faced with a dilemma: if Amazon prioritizes products with strong sales, but you haven’t made any sales yet or generated any historical data for A9, how can you ever hope to climb Amazon’s rankings?

The answer lies in performing Amazon SEO, starting with the keyword research that can get you found by the shoppers who matter to you.

Performing Amazon Keyword Research

Just like with Google, an Amazon SEO strategy must be built on keyword research.

Without the right keywords in your rankings, your products will seem irrelevant and won’t show up for users.

I’ll talk about how and where to optimize your listings for keywords in a minute. First, we need to know where to find keywords and how to perform keyword research.

One great way of performing keyword research that every Amazon seller should know about is using the Amazon search box.

It will autocomplete your queries as you type them, essentially doing the keyword research for you.

Take the example from the screenshot below.

Say you’re an online music store and want to start getting my turntables listed on Amazon.

Let me see what people are already searching for to get an idea of how to optimize your listings.

Obviously, [vinyl record turntable] is going to be a strong seed term with plenty of competition.

That isn’t the only search you should do, in this case.

You need to keep searching for all the variations of turntables that you can think of and see what comes up.

Take this next example:

amazon search bar showing product options

This search gives some more ideas because the predictions get more specific.

[Turntables for vinyl records], [turntables for vinyl records with speakers], and [turntables for vinyl records with cd player] are all specific queries.

Those are for the people who are further along in their buying journeys.

They know what they want. They just want to see the options.

Search for all the variations you can think of in the search box to get a decent list of keywords for which you could conceivably rank.

What are some other ways of doing Amazon keyword research?

Basically, all the other ways you know about for doing keyword research for Google.

Use free tools such as Keyword Planner or paid tools such as Semrush or Ahrefs to see the search volumes and difficulty ratings of these keywords.

You can also look at your Google Search Console data if you sell the same products on a website to see how people are finding you on Google.

All of these methods together should present you with a decent collection of relevant keywords that you can use to optimize your product listings.

Amazon Listing Optimization

Once you have your list of keywords, it’s time to use them to optimize your product listings.

If you’re already familiar with writing optimized product descriptions and other content for Google rankings, you’re in luck.

Doing it for Amazon works basically the same way.

You should start with your product titles.

Amazon requires that titles do not exceed 200 characters and that they include words that describe the product accurately.

This is also a chance for sellers to incorporate relevant keywords, but please don’t stuff.

Don’t stuff keywords in the rest of your product description, either.

You should use keywords in your prose, your bullet points, and your tech details where applicable. But use them appropriately.

The key is employing the most relevant keywords that also give you the best chances of driving traffic to your products.

Long-tail keywords are okay, too, since not everyone can rank on those perfect seed terms.

Don’t forget you can add keywords to your product pages’ back end, too!

They can help your visibility on Amazon even though customers can’t see them.

Finally, when you write your product descriptions, don’t be afraid to go long.

Be detailed. Tell a story.

It’s content, and it can help your products rank better.

Amazon Product Images

In any post about Amazon SEO, we have to talk about product images.

Whether you’re doing ecommerce on your own website or through Amazon, the right images can just about make or break you.

People are there to buy a product, and your written description goes only so far.

You can describe a vinyl record turntable all you want.

You can talk about its colors, its look, and its features.

But none of that matters if no one can see the thing!

This is why product images matter so much, and not just any images, but high-resolution images (more than 1,000 pixels one way), preferably ones taken professionally.

Remember, Amazon lets customers zoom in pretty closely on product images these days, so quality really matters here.

It’s worth it to note that Amazon doesn’t necessarily rank you higher based on your image quality.

You can and should add SEO-optimized alt text to your images so Google can deliver them in image search results, but the play here is really adding images that show your product from all angles.

Let your images show all the details because images can be just as strong in making a sale as product descriptions.

The other angle you should take for your Amazon product images is what are called lifestyle images, or images that show people using the products in the intended ways.

Why does that matter?

Anything that gets the customer to visualize using your products in their home is a plus.

They can see the item’s size in relation to real-life objects and get a sense of how it would be to use the item.

Zoomable product images alongside lifestyle images are vital to your success on Amazon.

Reviews & Ratings

I mentioned above that product reviews and ratings have a lot to do with where your products fall in Amazon’s search results.

This makes complete sense from a user-experience perspective.

Just like Google, Amazon’s main goal is to present users with positive, useful experiences.

This is why Amazon reviews and star ratings become vital for strong product rankings.

Think about it logically: will Amazon want to show you a bunch of one-star products on the first results page for a query?

No, that won’t help anyone.

Amazon wants customers to buy things, so it’s going to show products that many people have bought and liked.

What matters here are the stars and the number of reviews your products have.

Which product would you trust more: one with 17 reviews or one with 4,567 reviews?

Which set of reviews will give you a clearer picture of what you can expect?

So, if product reviews influence Amazon rankings, how do you get reviews? Amazon facilitates this for you with its Request a Review feature.

It’s always a good idea to reach out to customers after a purchase to see if they’d like to write a review.

The thing is, good products will tend to bring about reviews anyway.

When you’ve made people happy, they will want to share their satisfaction with others.

Negative reviews can always occur, but the trick is to respond swiftly to see what you can do to make the customer’s experience better from this point.

Measuring Product Performance Through Analytics

The final part of doing comprehensive Amazon SEO involves measuring your products’ performance through analytics.

Again, if you optimize a website for Google rankings, then you know the value in analytics.

When it comes to Amazon, you’ll want to track your SEO so you can continue your strategy for product optimization

Now, if you’re a brand owner, you have access to Amazon’s Brand Analytics.

For all other sellers, though, you have to get into third-party apps that track components such as keywords and product performance.

Most of these tools are all-in-one solutions, meaning you can perform keyword research, get help optimizing your listings, track your products and inventory, look at your finances, get competitor information, and track your Amazon SEO and paid media in general.

If you’re serious about making a living as a seller on Amazon, it will be worth the investment to get into one of these software tools. You just can’t afford to go in blind and risk not making an impact among everyone else vying for a spot on page one.

Which tools are the best?

There are several Amazon analytics tools that consistently rank highly among reviewers.

Some of those are Helium 10Sellics, and DataHawk.

Many of these companies offer either free trials or live demos so you can decide which tool is right for you.

A Strong Amazon SEO Strategy Starts Right Now

Sellers on Amazon have a lot of work cut out for them when they want to make it on the platform.

If you’re already familiar with optimizing content for Google, then you’re part of the way there already.

As long as you know that Amazon rewards sellers who stand out with amazing products that dazzle customers, you know what direction you need to go.


You can find original article by Kristopher Jones here

How to design a business card: 7 top tips

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Discover how to design a business card that makes a lasting impression.

Wondering how to design a business card? Once you’ve made your business plan, you’ve formed your business and created your branding, you’re ready to approach potential clients. There are many ways to do that and to place your business at the forefront of prospective clients’ minds. In this digital era, the business card might seem like the last thing to consider, but it’s surprising how these humble pieces of stationery have held on to their place in the business world. And if you haven’t got one, you could be missing out on leads.

Not all business cards are created equal, however, and there are a lot of poor quality business cards out there. While it’s possible for any small business to design its own cards using stock icons and order them from an online printer for the price of lunch, the results aren’t going to be very impressive. In this guide, we’ll look at how to design a business card that stands out and helps differentiate your business from the competition by following 10 key tips.

For inspiration, see our selection of the best business card designs, and if you’re looking for a quick solution, see our pick of the best business card templates. For more advice on setting up and promoting your creative business, see our guide to how to start a design business, how to improve your graphic design skills, and our tips for the perfect résumé for creatives.

01. Remember your basic designing principles

It might seem obvious but it’s worth reiterating that a business card is a piece of printed design material like any other. This means the basic principles of paper-based design apply when it comes to designing business cards. 

You should ensure you maintain a minimum size for your typography to maintain legibility and keep your key copy at least 5mm from the trim edge. Work at 300dpi for the best image reproduction and design in CMYK unless you’re working exclusively with spot colours.

Many designers also find it helps to use a grid to design business cards, as this can help ensure correct alignment and the right hierarchy of information (see our guide to grid theory for a recap).

02. Get creative (within the constraints)

You can get very creative with business cards. Experimenting with colour and texture can really help a business card to stand out, but remember that the ‘standard’ sizes are standard for a reason. A business card needs to be easy to stow in a pocket, wallet or organiser and cards designed in very different sizes or formats may be more likely to get lost or thrown out. 

There are actually a couple of ‘standard’ sizes depending on where you are in the world. One typical business card size is 55 x 85mm, but you’ll see many other sizes quoted on the web – check with printers. There are also standards in terms of the content you’ll want to include. While an image or a name alone can look bold, it’s not much use if people don’t know how to get in touch with you. You’ll typically want to include at least a business name, phone number and email address. You might also want to include a website address, physical address and social media handles depending on which of those your business has.

Even though the size and restricts you somewhat, you can still get creative with the space and work your design around presenting the essential information in a creative way – and remember there are two sides to a business card. You’ll probably put the information on one side, leaving the other side available for an eye-catching design.

Just be sure to avoid a couple of fairly common pitfalls when designing business cards. Ensure you provide a bleed as specified by your printer – this is commonly 3mm, but can be 5mm, so be sure to check. It’s also usually best to avoid using a straight border around the entire card as this will show up any misalignment in the trim if the card isn’t perfectly cut.

03. Use a quality support

Cheap business cards give themselves away immediately due to the quality of the support. They quickly crease or lose their colour and soon end up chucked in the bin. A quality heavyweight card stock is more durable and gives a much more pleasant feel in the hand, creating a much more professional impression.

Most business cards are printed on card stock, which is the most cost-effective option for printing. But if you want to get more creative (and you can afford it), you can print onto all sorts of different materials including transparent plastics, metals, wood or even slate. Just remember that a business card needs to be portable and easy to file away in a pocket or briefcase. You could print your business cards yourself. You can find letterpress kits on eBay at reasonable prices, allowing you to convert any card stock into your own business card with ease.

Another instant way to add impact to your business card is to use a special finish. Special finishes include the likes of foil blocking, spot-UV and metallic inks. While they can add a significant cost to your print, they offer the chance to create something that’s a lot more visually impressive and memorable. Different printers offer different options for finishes, so ask around to find out what they can do for you. Don’t be afraid to go to a specialist if your usual printer only offers straight four-colour print.

04. Make it tactile

A quality support and special finishes can allow you to design a more tactile business card through embossing or debossing text or designs. An even more eye-catching technique that can ensure your card spends more time in the hands of prospective clients is to use a die-cut process to remove elements from the card stock, leaving a void. You can either use a die to change the shape of your card (by rounding the corners, for example), or you can cut shapes out of the centre.

Dies are expensive to create the first time, although increasingly printers are offering laser-cut options that make it economical to create a die-cut look on shorter print-runs (check out our guides to the best laser cutters and best cricut machines if you want to print your own). There are some very creative examples on the web, like this die-cut letterpress stationery. When combined with creasing you can use the process to create architectural features in your card design (take a look at the example below).

06. Make your business card useful

One of the problems with paper is that it’s everywhere. Some people hold on to every bit of paper they receive, amassing a paper mountain, while others are far more ruthless and recycle things at the first opportunity. To avoid the risk of being recycled, it can help to give your business card a second function.

Of course, you have to be careful when you consider how to design a business card with a function since it should be something that’s relevant to your business and to your clients, and if making something useful means straying too far from the usual business card shape and size, your card might not be kept. That said, we’ve seen some very clever examples of ‘useful’ business cards, from business cards that serve as phone holders to seed packets, bottle openers and more.

You don’t want to copy an idea that’s already done the rounds, but sometimes incorporating function as well as form into a business card design can not only ensure that a prospective client keeps your cards, but also that they spend more time looking at it and more likely to remember it when they need to hire someone for a job.

07. Double-check your business card design

The final tip in our guide to how to design a business card applies to every bit of print work you do, but it’s so crucial that it’s worth repeating for business card design. Before you send your business card artwork off to the print shop (or before you start printing a lot of copies yourself if you’re printing your own), make sure you’ve double- and triple-checked every single detail. 

Make sure you’ve included the details that you need to and that they’re all correct. As we mentioned above, name, position, telephone number and email address are essential in almost all cases. We’d recommend asking someone else to look over your design to make sure it covers everything they would need (we’ve seen plenty of examples of business cards that include Instagram or Facebook icons, but don’t mention a username). And finally, check the spelling! There’s nothing worse than getting back your cards and discovering a typo in your name or email address or name. Check twice, print once is a wise adage.


You can find original article by Sam Hampton-Smoth here